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CCIE Associates

The CCIE Associate forum – initially conceived as a local format for participation, networking, collaboration and dissemination of information among various members of the UBC community undertaking CCIE related work – has grown into a regional and even national and international forum, with various strands, including academics, community organizers, students and a number of national and international Cultural Studies Centres. In addition to receiving notification of CCIE activities, CCIE Associates attend planning meetings (as non-voting observers), participate in CCIE workshops, seminars, conferences, lectures, etc. and have opportunities to collaborate with each other in research projects and grant applications. 

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATE CENTRES, Labs & programs • • •

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATES• • •

COmMUNITY ORGANIZATION ASSOCIATES

COMMUNITY AND STUDENT ASSOCIATES• • •

UBC ASSOCIATE CENTRES, DEPARTMENTS & OFFICES• • •

UBC'S Faculty ASSOCIATES• • •

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATE CENTRES, Labs & programs • • •

CCIE has forged links with a number of national and international Cultural Centres, Laboratories and programs in order to foster intellectual exchange and collaboration, and social justice work. These include the following:

UBC Okanagan Cultural Studies – CCIE has formed an association with the Cultural Studies program at UBC Okanagan, which is a new undergraduate program that was approved by UBC Okanagan’s Senate and Board of Governors this past year. The program is located in the Faculty of Creative & Critical Studies and allows students to take cultural studies courses, along with courses from other disciplines like English, Sociology, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies, etc, that flow within the following three streams: 1) Media Studies draws from studies of communications, film, and television to examine how different forms of representation alter being whether in print, film, television, Internet, or emergent digital technologies. 2) Global Cultural Studies examines the impact of colonialism and globalization on forms of cultural production and representation, transnational cultural relationships, and the formation of local and global identities 3) Critical and Cultural Theory provides an interdisciplinary theoretical framework for the study of cultural production, representation, and practices in consideration of effects on class, ethnicity, race, nationality, gender, sexuality, and power.

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Audiovisual Media Lab for the study of Cultures and Societies (The AMLAC&S), University of Ottawa – The AMLAC&S is an audiovisual media laboratory for the study of cultures in multicultural societies. This lab was founded by Dr Boulou Ebanda de B'béri in 2005, with the financial help of the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Research Funds. The AMLAC&S is a space dedicated to the research, documentation, and the creation of audiovisual productions that specifically target the cultural practices of communities or marginalized identity group formations such as blacks and Aboriginals people. The primary philosophy behind the AMLAC&S is to produce research material that exposes contributions made by cultural, ethnic and racial minorities through their specific cultural practices. This endeavor may begin by the conceptualization of questions of citizenship within multicultural societies such as Canada. Equipped with a working area endowed by the Faculty of Arts of the University of Ottawa, the AMLAC&S owns filming equipments (three digital cameras, sound recording systems and lighting kits) and non-linear Final Cut Pro program mounted on five Apple Pro super-computers. The AMLAC&S also owns its own server for storing audiovisual data and other research databases. For more information or email.
    CCIE and the AMLAC&S are collaborating on the exploration of African continental and diasporic cultural studies. Currently CCIE and AMLAC&S are undertaking the Promised Land Project.

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The Paulo and Nita Freire Project for Critical Pedagogy, McGill University – is dedicated to building an international critical community which works to promote social justice in a variety of cultural contexts. CCIE director, Handel Wright, has worked on several projects on youth studies and critical pedagogy with both Joe Kincheloe and Shirley Steinberg.

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Cultural Studies Praxis Collective, University of Washington – The Cultural Studies Praxis Collective (CSPC) is a multi-year collaboration of faculty and academic staff at University of Washington Bothell (UWB), University of Washington Seattle (UWS), Cascadia Community College (CCC), and Bellevue Community College (BCC). Its long-term goals are to generate and disseminate new research on the multiple locations of the humanities, to initiate and institutionalize curricular innovation across the four campuses, and to build and develop arts and cultural pathways for community-based research and teaching. Members of the CSPC pursue these goals by working with a wide variety of organizations and projects, including the Master of Arts in Cultural Studies at UWB and the Institute on the Public Humanities for Doctoral Students at UWS.

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Sport and Citizenship Initiative, Ohio State University – The Sport & Citizenship Initiative, which emerged from The John Glenn School of Public Affairs at Ohio State, fosters the creation and dissemination of knowledge on the intersections of sport, citizenship, and society directed toward promoting ethical/principled conduct and positive community engagement. The Sport & Citizenship Initiative has three interrelated goals: 1) Fostering Interdisciplinary Research– The Initiative builds a program of interdisciplinary research and conferences, including: Research Grants Commissioned Studies and Evaluations Distinguished Scholars Annual Conference 2) Incubating Innovative Ideas– The Center offers a laboratory for testing and implementing new ideas, including: University Seminars Best Practice Models Policy Forums Public Lectures Summer Institutes, Workshops, and Seminars for Specific Target Audiences 3) Engaging Society through Dissemination of New Knowledge - Regular publications—ranging from print to electronic formats—challenge broad cross-sections of society to consider the ways in which sport, citizenship, and society coincide.

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CCIE has links with three Centres at Roehampton University in London, England: Centre for Research on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculturalism (CRONEM), Crucible and The Centre for Research in Beliefs, Rights and Values in Education (BRaVE). These Centres are collaborating with CCIE on projects centered around multicultural and socio-cultural differences.

CRONEM is a multidisciplinary research centre in the field of nationalism, ethnicity and multiculturalism. It brings together those at the University of Surrey and Roehampton University who are engaged in issues which lie at the nexus between nation, ethnicity, multiculturalism, citizenship and migration. Reflection on these issues through arts and humanities disciplines provides a distinctive focus for this Centre and added value in funding bids. CRONEM is focusing on crucial developments within contemporary society by drawing on the expertise of those working in internationally renowned academic units across the areas of Dance, Economics, Education, European Studies, Linguistics, Psychology, Social Anthropology and Sociology. It also benefits from the expertise of an Advisory Board composed of renowned figures from the fields of academia, government, media and user groups.

Crucible is a centre of excellence in education in human rights, social justice and citizenship, supported by the Higher Education Funding Council. It is one of 74 Centres of Teaching and Learning Excellence (CETLs) funded by the Higher Education Funding Council of England.

BRaVE brings together staff and research students from a number of related areas of academic interest and professional experience including personal, social and health education (PSHE), citizenship and human rights education.

• • •

The School of Social Sciences, Media and Cultural Studies (SSMCS), University of East London, UK – spans a wide range of interdisciplinary programmes and research interests, drawing upon the humanities and social sciences, to create an academic and intellectual environment that focuses upon the creative, cultural and information technology industries, social policy, social work and the social sciences. Professor of Cultural Studies, Mica Nava, sits on the international advisory of the CCIE.

• • •

Kwan Fong Cultural Research and Development Programme (KFCRD) – As a Program within the Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Hong Kong, the mission of the Kwan Fong Cultural Research and Development Programme (KFCRD) is to develop international cultural research networks based at Lingnan University and to link these to training and development projects involving cultural industry and community groups, policy-makers, managers, teachers and students in Hong Kong.
    CCIE and Lingnan University of Hong Kong are collaborating in transnational cultural studies and cultural studies of education.

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NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATES• • •

 

Dr. Ali Abdi

Ali A. Abdi
Professor
Department of Educational Policy Studies
University of Alberta

Ali A. Abdi is Professor of Education and International Development at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. He is President of Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC) (2007-2009), Co-Director, Global Education Network (University of Alberta), executive committee member, Citizenship Education Research Network (CERN), and founding editor of the online publication, Journal of Contemporary Issues in Education. He has worked on international research projects in Somalia, South Africa, Senegal and Zambia. He is the author of Culture, education and development in South Africa: historical and contemporary perspectives (2002); co-author (with Ratna Ghosh) of Education and the politics of difference (2004); and co-editor of Issues in Africa education: sociological perspectives (2005); African education and globalization: critical perspectives (2006), and Educating for human rights and global citizenship (in press).

 

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Dr. Jeff Boyer

Jefferson C. Boyer
Professor
Department of Anthropology
Appalachian State University

Jeff Boyer is Professor of Anthropology and founder of the Goodnight Family Sustainable Development Program at ASU. He writes on Honduran, Central American and Appalachian agrarian movements, rural development, and sustainability issues. He is currently working on a two volume series entitled Agrarian Honduras: Struggles for Another Modernity.  He is a board member of the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tennessee. He was co-organizer of “citizens energy policy workshop: Appalachia and the Southeast” at Highlander in September, 2006, and accompanied the Appalachian coalfield delegation to the UN Commission on Sustainable Development meeting on energy and climate change in May, 2007. He also works with a North Carolina network linked with the Center for Integrating Research and Action at UNC-Chapel Hill working on re-localizing our food system.

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Dr. Bruce Burgett

Bruce Burgett
Professor
Department of English & Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Program
University of Washington, Bothell

Bruce Burgett is a Professor in the Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences program at UWB.  His research interests span across a number of broad categories, including American Studies, Cultural Studies, Queer Studies, Critical Race Studies, Interdisciplinary, Public  Culture, and Public Scholarship.  His first book, entitled Sentimental Bodies: Sex, Gender, and Citizenship in the Early Republic, was published by Princeton University Press in 1998.  He is currently working on a second book, tentatively titled American Sex: Cultures of Sexual Reform in and beyond the Antebellum U.S. (University of Chicago Press), as well as co-editing a volume entitled Keywords of American Cultural Studies for NYU Press. In addition, he sits on the editorial board of two journals: American Quarterly and American Literary History.

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Dr. Marisa Vorraber Costa

Marisa Vorraber Costa
Professor
University of Rio Grande do Sul

Marisa Vorraber Costa is Professor of Teaching and Curriculum at UFRGS, where she teaches and researches Cultural Studies.  She is the author of two books: Teachers Work and Professionalism (1995) and Has the School a Future? (2003). She also has edited several books, including Investigative Ways – new glances in education research (1996), Elementary Schools in the Turn of the Century: culture, politics and curriculum (1996), Popular Education Today (1998), School Curriculum at the Borders of the Contemporaneous (1998), Cultural Studies in Education (2000), Investigative Ways II – new forms of thought and doing research in education (2002), Investigative Ways III – risk and possibilities of doing research in the borders (2005)and Teachers in the Cultural Policy (2006). Her current research work focuses on cultural artifacts regarding the relations between discourses and power.

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Dr. Boulou Ebanda de B'béri

Boulou Ebanda de B'béri
Assistant Professor
Department of Communication
University of Ottawa

Boulou de B'béri undertakes research in the areas of film and cultural studies, Black African and national cinema, identity and oral tradition in multi-cultural nations, ‘intermediality’ in political creations, and cultural representation. He has authored two books: Mapping Alternative Expressions of Blackness in Cinema (Bayreuth, Germany) and Au-delà discours l’expérience du “Verbe” dans les cinémas d’Afrique noire (Beyond Discourses: The Experience of the “Verb” in Black African Cinemas), which is forthcoming with  Laval University Press.  His current research focuses on the articulations of identity-politics in some audiovisual narratives produced in the Americas (including North America), Africa, and Australia, focusing on specific cultures and groups of identity formation that have faced various forms of colonialism.

 • •

Dr. Nombuso Dlamini

Nombuso Dlamini
Associate Professor and Research Leadership Chair
Faculty of Education
University of Windsor

Nomuso Dlamini is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education and co-facilitator of The Applied Social Welfare Research and Evaluation Group at the University of Windsor (ASWREG).  Her research interests include ethnic minority communities, immigrant women, social identity, teacher education, and the education system in South Africa.  Her first book, entitled Youth and Identity Politics in South Africa, 1990-94, was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2006. She also has an edited book of essays, entitled New Directions in African Education, forthcoming with the University of Calgary Press. In addition to her research contributions, Dr. Dlamini is an Advisory Board member of the New Scholars Fund: Congress of Social Sciences in Education (CSSE) and a Committee Member of The Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC).

 • •

Dr. Suman Fernando

Suman Fernando
Honorary Senior Lecturer in Mental Health
Centre for Migration and Social Care
University of Kent, UK

Suman Fernando is a retired anti-racist psychiatrist who worked as a consultant psychiatrist in Enfield (Middlesex) for over twenty years until mid-1993. He has lectured widely on issues of ‘race’, racism and culture in the mental health field in both UK and Canada, in addition to serving on the Mental Health Act Commission for nine years until 1995 where he chaired its National Standing Committee on Race and Culture. His is also the author of several books, including Cultural Diversity, Mental Health and Psychiatry. The Struggle Against Racism (2003), Mental Health, Race and Culture (1991 and 2002), Forensic Psychiatry, Race and Culture (1998). Currently, Dr. Fernando is a visiting professor in the Department of Applied Social Science at London Metropolitan University and an honorary senior lecturer in mental health at the University of Kent.

 • •

Dr. Leslee Fisher

Leslee Fisher
Associate Professor
Department of Exercise, Sport, and Leisure Studies
University of Tennessee

Leslee Fisher is an Associate Professor in the Department of Exercise, Sport and Leisure Studies at the University of Tennessee.  Her primary research interests include psychosocial areas of sport; moral development, ethics, and orientation in sport, gender identity and sport subcultures, and positive deviance in sport (e.g., addiction and the use of anabolic steroids).   She has published numerous articles in such journals as Athletic Insight, Women in Sport & Physical Activity Journal, The Sports Psychologist and the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology. In addition to her academic contributions, Dr. Fisher is currently the Secretary-Treasurer of the Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology.

 • •

Dr. Siri Gamage

Sirisena Gamage
Senior Lecturer
School of Professional Development & Leadership
University of New England, Australia

Siri Gamage is a Senior Lecturer in Multicultural Studies at the School of Education and the School of Professional Development and Leadership at the University of New England, Australia. He undertakes research on a number of different topics and issues, including globalization, intercultural studies, critical multicultural and race theory to social context of education and multiculturalism across countries. Dr. Gamage’s first book, which he co-authored book with S. Watson, entitled Conflict and Community in Contemporary Sri Lanka, was published in 1999 by Sage in New Delhi. Currently, Dr. Gamage is pursuing work in comparative multiculturalism, immigrant identities and related discourses in Australia and Canada. He was a visiting scholar at CCIE in October 2006.

 • •

Dr. Jean Hardisty

Jean Hardisty
President Emerita
Political Research Associates

Jean Hardisty is the Founder and President Emerita of Political Research Associates (PRA), a Boston-based research center that analyzes right wing, authoritarian, and anti-democratic trends and publishes educational materials for the general public. She has authored many published essays on the inner workings and motivations of the right. Her book, Mobilizing Resentment: Conservative Resurgence from the John Birch Society to the Promise Keepers, was published by Beacon Press in October 1999.  In addition to her publications, Dr. Hardisty serves on the Board of Directors of the Center for Community Change, the Highlander Education and Research Center, and the Women's Community Cancer Project.

• •  

Dr. Faye Harrison

Faye Harrison
Professor
University of Florida

Faye Harrison is a Professor in African American Studies and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Florida. Her research interests include the African diaspora, the Caribbean, social inequality, human rights, political economy, history of anthropology, critical race feminism. Her research approach is one that emphasizes race, gender, class, and (trans)national identity as interlocking dimensions of difference, inequality, and power. Over the years, she's done extensive ethnographic and documentary research in the United States, Great Britain, and the Caribbean; however, her research interests have taken her to other places as well, including Mexico, Denmark, South Africa, and China. She has published numerous books, journal articles and book chapters, including most recently Resisting Racism: Global Perspectives on Race, Gender, and Human Rights (Ed.), 2005, and African-American Pioneers in Anthropology (co-ed. with Ira E. Harrison), 1999. Her new book, Outsider Within: Reworking Anthropology in the Global Age, is forthcoming with University of Illinois Press in 2007.

• •  

Dr. Yvonne Hébert

Yvonne Hébert
Professor
University of Calgary

Yvonne Hébert is a Professor of Education, University of Calgary, with research interests in youth, identity, democracy, minority studies, policy and educational reform. Her current research projects focus on youth’s mobility and identity construction with case studies in three universities of youth from francophone community schools; youth’s negotiation of difference and democracy, a comparative study in three Canadian cities; conceptions of children and youth; and the impact of educational reform on teaching practices, school culture and achievement. She is co-editor of Negotiating Trans-cultural Lives: Belongings and Social Capital among Youth in Comparative Perspectives (with Dirk Hoerder & Irina Schmitt); editor of Citizenship in Transformation in Canada; co-editor of Values, Human Rights and Citizenship Education in Transnational Perspectives, a thematic issue of the journal, Canadian and International Education; author of a volume of the National Core French Study, Le syllabus de formation langagière générale; and co-editor of Indian Education in Canada Vol. 1 & 2. She serves on the board of three journals, Inter-American Journal of Education for Democracy, International Journal of Citizenship Teaching and Learning, and Encounters on Education. She continues to provide committed leadership in selected national and international research and professional organizations.

• •  


Dr. Robert Helfenbein

Robert J. Helfenbein
Assistant Professor of Teacher Education
Indiana University-Indianapolis

Rob Helfenbein is Assistant Professor of Teacher Education at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, adjunct faculty in the Department of Geography, and Associate Director of the Center for Urban and Multicultural Education (CUME) in the School of Education.  A former middle and high school social studies teacher, his current research interests include qualitative studies of youth and schooling with a focus on critical geography, cultural studies of education, urban education and youth culture, and contemporary curriculum theory.  His most recent publications include co-editing the book Unsettling beliefs: Teaching Theory to Teachers (Information Age Press) and several articles appearing in Review of Education/Pedagogy/Cultural Studies, Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, and The Social Studies.

• •  

Dr. Annette Henry

Annette Henry
Professor and Head
Language and Literacy Education (LLED), Faculty of Education
University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, BC

Annette Henry is Professor and Head of Language and Literacy Education (LLED) in the Faculty of Education at UBC. Her scholarship examines Black women teachers’ practice in the U. S. and Canada as well as race, language, gender and culture in socio-cultural contexts of teaching and learning. She is author of Taking Back Control: African Canadian Women Teachers’ Lives and Practice. (SUNY, 1998). Recent publications include: Black feminist thought: Critiques and Contributions (2005) in W. Watkins (Ed) Black protest thought. (pp. 89-106) New York: Peter Lang; “There’s salt-water in our blood”: The ‘Middle Passage’ epistemology of two Black mothers regarding the spiritual education of their daughters; International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 19: 3 (2006), and Historical Studies: Groups/Institutions in Complementary Methods for research in Education, J. Green, G. Camilli, and P. Elmore (Eds), (Erlbaum, 2006). She is associate editor and book review editor for Race, Ethnicity and Education. She is on the editorial boards of Teaching for Social Justice (Teachers College Press), Educational Researcher, and the advisory boards of Konbit Pwof (Project Teach Haiti), and Food First.

• •

Dr. Michael Hoechsmann

Michael Hoechsmann
Assistant Professor
McGill University
Department of Integrated Studies in Education

Michael Hoechsmann is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education. His research interests are in the areas of media, new media, literacy, new literacies, youth, cultural studies and education. His work has appeared in English Quarterly, Taboo: The Journal of Culture and Education, McGill Journal of Education, Review of Education/Pedagogy/Cultural Studies, European Journal of Cultural Studies, Convergence:  Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, Anuario de Ciencias Sociales (Mexico), and Textual Studies in Canada. He is preparing a manuscript with Bronwen E. Low entitled Reading Youth Writing: “New” Literacies, Cultural Studies and Education (Peter Lang). For four years, he was the Director of Education of Young People’s Press, a non-profit news service for youth 14-24 <www.ypp.net>.

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Dr. Eeva Jokinen

EEva Jokinen
Professor
Department of Social Policy
University of Joensuu, Finland

Eeva Jokinen is Professor of Social Policy at the University of Joensuu. Her research interests vary from mothering to travel, from mundane everyday experiences to new forms of labour, but the main goal is to explore the practices and logics of gender, affects and power structures. To put it differently: how is the present new global capitalism made livable by different groups and individuals. She has published and edited several books on motherhood, embodiment and everyday practices. Her publications in the area include ‘The Makings of Motherhood in Diary Narratives.’ Qualitative Inquiry 2004(10)3. She has written several international articles on tourism theories together with Professor Soile Veijola. Eeva Jokinen’s current research project financed by the Academy of Finland concerns the blurring borders of work and home in a post-fordist society.

 • •

Dr. Mikko Lehtonen

Mikko Lehtonen
Professor
Department of Literature and the Arts
University of Tampere, Finland

Mikko Lehtonen is a Professor of Media Culture in the Department of Literature and the Arts at the University of Tampere. His primary research interests include modern cultural and literary theories, cultural construction of masculinities, printed word at the age of mediatization, the cultural significance of the 9/11 and Finland and multiculturalism. He has published numerous monographs in Finnish and is the author of The Cultural Analysis of Texts, which was published by Sage in 2000.  He also is a member of the editorial boards of two central journals in the field, Cultural Studies and European Journal of Cultural Studies. He has received numerous awards for his work, including The Researcher of the Year Award by The Finnish Union of University Researchers and Teachers in 2002.

 • •

 

Dr. Zeus Leonardo

Zeus Leonardo
Visiting Associate Professor
Department of Education
University of California, Berkeley

Zeus Leonardo is a Visiting Associate Professor of Education at the University of California, Berkeley.  He earned both his B.A. in English and Ph.D. in Education from UCLA. Dr. Leonardo has published several dozen articles and book chapters on critical educational theory. He is the author of Ideology, Discourse, and School Reform (Praeger) and he is editor of Critical Pedagogy and Race (Blackwell), and co-editor (with Tejeda and Martinez) of Charting New Terrains of Chicano(a)/Latino(a) Education (Hampton).  His articles have appeared in Educational Researcher; Race, Ethnicity, and Education; and Educational Philosophy and Theory.  Some of his essays include: “The Souls of White Folk,” “Critical Social Theory and Transformative Knowledge,” and “The Unhappy Marriage between Marxism and Race Critique.”  In 2007, he edited a special issue of Race Ethnicity & Education on No Child Left Behind. He is currently working on the Handbook of Cultural Politics and Education (SensePublishers). Dr. Leonardo’s current research interests involve the study of ideologies and discourses in education. Much of his work is interdisciplinary and draws insights from sociology, contemporary philosophy, and cultural studies. In particular, he engages critical theories to inform his analysis of the relationship between schooling and social relations, such as race, class, culture, and gender. His research is informed by the premise that educational knowledge should promote the democratization of schools and society. 

 • •

Peter Mayo

Peter Mayo
Professor and Head of Department of Education Studies
University of Malta

Peter Mayo is President of the Mediterranean Society of Comparative Education (2008-2010). Mayo's work is in the areas of adult education, sociology, critical theory and pedagogy and postcolonialism. He co-edits the book series, Postcolonial Studies in Education for Palgrave-Macmillan and edits the series International Issues in Adult Education for Sense Publishers. His numerous publications include Gramsci, Freire and Adult Education (Zed Books, 1999); Liberating Praxis: Paulo Freire's Legacy for Radical Education and Politics (Praeger, 2004); and Public Intellectuals, Radical Democracy and Social Movements: A Book of Interviews (with C Borg, Peter Lang, 2007).

 • •

Dr. Dolana Mogadime

Dolana Mogadime
Assistant Professor
Faculty of Education
Brock University

Dolana Mogadime is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Brock University. Her research interests are in the area of School Ethnography; Classroom Research in Language Arts and Social Studies; Teacher as Researcher; Action Research and Self-study; Critical Pedagogy and Anti-racist Feminist Pedagogy; Autobiography and Teachers Life Histories; Social Justice and Equity Studies; Curriculum Reform. She has published in a variety of journals, including the Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering, the Journal of Black Studies, Canadian Woman Studies Journal. She also is the author of several book chapters and has a piece forthcoming in Under the gaze: Recentering black feminist discourse in Canadian feminist landscape, and anthology edited by N.Wane and N Massaquoi.

 • •

Dr. William Morgan

William J. Morgan
Professor in Social and Cultural Foundations
School of Educational Policy and Leadership
The Ohio State University

William Morgan is a Professor in the School of Physical Activity and Educational Services. His research interests are in the areas of ethics and critical political theory as it relates to sports and popular culture; the moral significance of sport and its political potential to be a progressive force in democratic societies; private-public distinction and its moral and political ramifications for modern sports. He has published numerous books and co-edited several collections of essays, including Ethics in Sport (2001), Philosophic Inquiry in Sport (1995), and Leftist Theories of Sport: A Critique and Reconsideration (1994).  In addition, Professor Morgan has served on the editorial boards of several major journals and was editor of the Journal of the Philosophy of Sport from 1994-1998.

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Dr. Diana Moyer

Diana Moyer
Assistant Professor
Department of Cultural Studies in Education
University of Tennessee

Diana Moyer is Assistant Professor in the Department of Instructional Technology and Educational Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her areas of research include gender and the history of education and the intersections of cultural studies and educational foundations. Her most recent publications include an article, entitled “University Speaker Censorship in 1951 and Today,” in Journal of Thought and a chapter on “Philosophical and Historical Research” in K. Tobin and Joe Kincheloe’s Doing Educational Research: A Handbook. Dr. Moyer also serves as a board member for Research on Women and Education, an AERA special interest group, and the University of Tennessee Association for Women Faculty.

 • •

Dr. Francis Rains

Frances V. Rains
Associate Professor
Evergreen State College

Frances V. Rains is an Associate Professor at ESC and a founding member of the advisory Leadership Council for the Indigenous Ways of Knowing Graduate Program at Lewis & Clark College. Her research interests include Indigenous Decolonization, Indigenous Women, Native History, Native representation in Curriculum, Women of Color in academe, Critical Race Theory, Racism/White Privilege and American Indian Education. Her recent scholarship includes: "The Color of Social Studies: A Post-Social Studies Reality Check" (2006) in E.W. Ross (Ed.) The Social Studies Curriculum, 3rd edition (pp.137-156) SUNY Press; "Making Intellectual Space: Self-Determination & Indigenous Research" (2006) in D.S. Pollard & O.M. Welch (Eds.), From Center to Margins: The importance of Self-Definition in Research (pp.21-48) SUNY Press.

 • •

Sue Saltmarsh

Sue Saltmarsh
Senior Lecturer
Charles Sturt University, Australia

Sue Saltmarsh is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Politics in Education at Charles Sturt University, Australia. Her research interests are informed by poststructuralist theories of power, knowledge, subjectivity and agency in the work of Michel de Certeau, Michel Foucault and Judith Butler. Her current research spans a range of educational and social domains, with a focus on the discursive production of subjectivities and social relations. She is particularly interested in institutional violence, and its intersections with/appropriations of language, representation and consumption. More information forthcoming.

 • •

Dr. Elizabeth Seaton

Elizabeth Seaton
Independent Scholar
Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University

Prior to returning to British Columbia in 2006, Beth Seaton was tenured faculty at York University, where she was instrumental in developing both the undergraduate programme in Communication Studies and the Joint Graduate Programme in Communication and Culture. She has held Visiting Scholar positions at Green College, UBC and the Centre for Research in Gender and Women’s Studies, UBC, and serves on the editorial boards of a number of journals. Dr. Seaton’s research and extensive publications  address the cultural mediations of power, representation, and social identity. Her current work involves the expansive project “A Physiology of Culture”, which focuses upon the dialectical relationships of humans to their natural, social and cultural environments. Recent publications from this project especially concern the interactions of human and  non-human worlds during conditions of ecological catastrophe. Dr. Seaton teaches courses on “Difference and Representation”; “Gender, Education and Popular Culture”; and “Body and Society” for the Women’s Studies Programme at U.B.C.

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Dr. Ozlem Sensoy

Ozlem Sensoy
Assistant Professor
Faculty of Education
Simon Fraser University

Ozlem Sensoy is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at SFU. Her research focuses on the relationship between popular culture and school culture, in particular how media and school curricula represent and educate about social groups (racial, ethnic, gender, ability, class, and sexuality). Her other research interests include critical multicultural education, social issues in education, societal curriculum, cultural studies, Orientalism, middle east studies, visual research methods. She recently co-authored a paper with Dr. Robin DiAngelo, entitled “’I wouldn’t want to be a woman in the Middle East”: White female student teachers and the narrative of the oppressed Muslim woman,” which appears in Radical Pedagogy.

 • •

Dr. Michael Singh

Michael Singh
Professor
Centre for Educational Research
University of Western Sydney, Australia

Michael Singh is a Professor in the Centre for Educational Research at UWS.  He undertakes comparative cultural studies research in the interdependent areas of education and training, and the multiple levels for effecting reform, so as to explore the intersections of urban, regional and international relations. His latest book, Globalizing Education (edited with M. Apple and J. Kenway) explores the local/global connectedness evident in policies and pedagogies governing education and its reform.  His previous book, Appropriating English (with P. Kell and A. Pandian) studied innovations in trans-national business of English language teaching.  In 2005, Professor Singh convened the international research Conference of the Australian Association of Research in Education and served as its President in 2006.

 • •

Ciaran Sugrue

Ciaran Sugrue
Director of Post-graduate Studies in Education
Department of Education
Dublin City University,  St. Patrick’s College

Ciaran Sugrue is Director of Post Graduate Studies in Education at St. Patrick’s College, Dublin City University. His areas of research include educational change and educational leadership, continuing professional development, teacher education reform, life history and qualitative methods. Dr. Sugrue is the author of several edited collections of essays, including Passionate Principalship: Learning from Life History of School Leaders (in press), Curriculum and Ideology: Irish Experiences, International Perspectives (2004) and International Handbook on the Continuing Professional Development of Teachers (2004).

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Dr. Andrew Thornton

Andrew Thornton
Senior Lecturer
Centre for Scientific and Cultural Research in Sport
Roehampton University, UK

Andrew Thornton is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Cultural Studies of Sport and Exercise. His main research and teaching interests are concerned with social (in)equality as they are produced and transgressed in people’s experience of sport and popular culture. He has published several articles and book chapters, which includes a recent article that he co-authored with Eileen Kennedy and Helen Pussard that illustrates how the London 2012 bid process was itself a sport spectacle that worked to negate criticism and obscure contradictions in the rhetoric and promotion of the host city campaign. The article is published in World Leisure Journal, Vol. 48:3 (2006).

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Dr. Soile Veijola

Soile Veijola
Professor of Cultural Studies of Tourism
University of Lapland, Finland

Soile Veijola is a sociologist and Professor of Cultural Studies of Tourism at the University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland. She is also Adjunct Professor (Dozent) in Sports Tourism at the University of Jyväskylä. Her earlier publications include feminist critiques of theorising on tourism, mostly co-authored with Eeva Jokinen, and semiotic analyses of mixed social orders in sports and society. She is currently leading an interdisciplinary research project financed by the Academy of Finland entitled Tourism as Work, and her own research in it focuses on gendered workscapes in tourism and aims at building epistemic bridges between independent and industry-driven tourism research.

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Dr. Jonathan Warren

Jonathan Warren
Director and Associate Professor
Henry M. Jackman School of International Studies
University of Washington

Jonathan Warren is the Chair and Associate Professor of Latin American Studies in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. He has published several articles on race and ethnicity in the Americas, co-produced of the award winning documentary film, Just Black?, curated the controversial art exhibit Viet Nam Now and authored a book on indigenous politics in Brazil titled Racial Revolutions (2001). Currently, he is working on a comparative study of Vietnam and Brazil, examining the socio-cultural underpinnings of economic development.

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COmMUNITY ORGANIZATION ASSOCIATES • • •

CCIE has forged links with a number of community organizations to foster exchange and collaboration, and to initiate social justice work across a range of academic and more community-focused locations and settings. These include the following:

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MOSAIC

MOSAIC is a multilingual non-profit organization dedicated to addressing issues that affect immigrants and refugees in the course of their settlement and integration into Canadian society. MOSAIC's mandate is to support and to empower immigrant and refugee communities, helping them to address critical issues in their neighborhoods and workplace.

CCIE and MOSAIC collaborations include:

NuYuID (New Youth Identity)
NuYuID brought together MOSAIC’s popular youth program, NuYu, in which immigrant youth undergo training in popular theatre to discuss, reflect and act upon their experiences as immigrant youth with CCIE’s Expressing and Exploring Youth Identities in a Multicultural Context project. The result of the collaboration was an eight-week intensive program in which 14 new immigrant youth participated in Theatre of the Oppressed training and performed results in a public forum on the theme of identity and belonging. CCIE simultaneously conducted a critical ethnography (participant observation, individual and focus group interviews) of the youths’ exploration of identity and belonging in Canada, Vancouver, school and local communities.

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Dresden Community Development Association

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Highlander Center
New Market, Tennessee, United States

The Highlander Center provides education and support to poor and working people fighting economic injustice, poverty, prejudice, and environmental destruction. It helps grassroots leaders create the tools necessary for building broad-based movements for change. For more on their programs and initiatives, visit their website at http://www.highlandercenter.org/

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The Chatham-Kent Black Historical Society
Chatham, Ontario

The Chatham-Kent Black Historical Society Heritage and Research Room is a Non-profit organization, which was founded in 1992 and incorporated in 1994. They are an affiliated society of the Ontario Historical Society, which was founded in 1888. Membership is open to anyone who is a citizen or legal resident of Canada or the United States, who supports the purposes of the Society. 


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Whistler Interfaith Society

The Whistler Interfaith Society, originally the Whistler Skiers Chapel Society, is an organization that aims to build bridges of inter-religious understanding and cooperation. It is an organization that is especially attuned to the complexities of providing spiritual and religious care in multi-cultural and multi-faith settings. For more on this organization, visit the Resort Municipality of Whistler website at http://www.whistler.ca/content/view/256/103/

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COMMUNITY AND STUDENT ASSOCIATES• • •

 

Marie Carter

Marie Carter
Dresden Community Development Corporation

Marie Carter is a researcher, writer, social justice advocate and historian specializing in both modern and historical migration and social justice issues. As co-ordinator of the Office for Social Justice, and the co-chair of the Migrant Workers Ministries Committee (MWMC) of the Diocese of London she researches, educates and lobbies on behalf of agricultural migrant workers, the trafficked and undocumented. With the MWMC she assists church based migrant outreach groups with networking and coordination of activities in the London Diocese; has provided grassroots input for  a national awareness campaign through KAIROS Canada; and has lobbied governments on migrant rights. In addition she has developed parish-based education and awareness campaigns to encourage greater outreach for migrant workers. Carter is also a local historian, who is working to restore the lost heritage of the Dawn Settlement's early black pioneers. As the heritage representative of the Dresden Community Development Corporation (dresden.ca) she is striving to create greater appreciation of the contributions of early black pioneers and civil rights activists. With dresden.ca she is currently a partner in the Promised Land Project. In the past her research and writing has assisted dresden.ca with the development of the TrilliumTrail Historical Walk, and the Dawn Settlement tour. She has also contributed historical research to Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site. Carter lives in Dresden with her husband Jeff and their two children.

Lynne Cruz

Lynne Cruz
Cross-Cultural Communications

Lynne Cruz develops and delivers cross-cultural communications workshops with a special interest in Latin America. She completed an honours thesis for a B. A. in Communications from Simon Fraser University related to Canada’s refugee determination system has worked as an English as a Foreign Language teacher in Costa Rica. She has completed a Certificate in Intercultural Studies from the University of British Columbia and is a member of SIETAR BC and Vancouver Multicultural Society.

Tina Fraser

Tina Ngaroimata Fraser
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health
Hosted by University of Northern British Columbia

Tina Ngaroimata Fraser is a Maori woman from Aotearoa, New Zealand. Her tribal affiliates are Tuhoe, Ngati Ranginui and Ngati Kahungunu. She has lived in northern BC for over 32 years working with the Carrier Nation, Cree and Metis peoples. She is an award winner of the 1993 Governor General of Canada’s Commemorative Award, 1993 Lieutenant Governor General of British Columbia Award, and the Prince George 1996 Citizenship of the Year Award. She, guided by the Carrier people was instrumental in developing what would be the first Urban Aboriginal language nest in BC (1996) to officially operate. Shortly after the Aboriginal Head Start, the (On/Off Reserve) programs, started to flourish. Tina is currently the BC Initiatives Research Manager for Aboriginal Health which is hosted by the National Collaborating Centre and housed at the University of Northern British Columbia; where she also teaches in the First Nations Studies, Education and Health. Tina is currently a PhD Candidate in Educational Studies with the University of British Columbia.   Tina is married with two daughters aged (30 and 25 yrs old) and an (18 yr old) son who was born with Down syndrome and autism. She has been a foster parent for 28 years caring for 77 children.

Brian Ganter

Brian Ganter 
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of English
University of Washington, Seattle

Brian Ganter is finishing his Ph.D. in English at the University of Washington-Seattle, where he is also a member of the Cultural Studies Praxis Collective (CSPC). He currently resides in Seattle and in Vancouver, BC. Brian’s teaching and research engage with Marxist and post-marxist theory, critical theory, critical pedagogy, cultural studies and the new media, as well as the fields of global and (post)colonial literatures and cultures. He is also interested in film as an arena of transformative praxis and has just finished co-directing the documentary feature film Metropole which will be released in 2007-08. His writings have appeared in various journals including Textual Practice and The Red Critique.

Rick Hesch

Rick Hesch
Community-based Educator

Rick Hesch is a community-based educator and activist who has spent most of his career working as an ally of Aboriginal peoples’ struggles for a more just and culturally relevant formal education. Dr. Hesch worked within the Sturgeon Lake (Cree) First Nation for five years in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s as well as with the Metis in Saskatchewan as a community organizer and as a pre-university and teacher educator. After completing his dissertation at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (University of Toronto) in 1993 on the cultural and ideological formation of Indigenous preservice teachers, Rick worked in Alberta and Manitoba with the Blood, Peigan, Oji-Cree and Cree for the following fifteen years as well as consulting in the field of antiracism education in Winnipeg.  A secondary interest is education for international labour solidarity, the theme of his master’s thesis. He also chaired the Alberta Council for Global Justice, and is currently supporting an Indigenous organization in Phoenix, fighting for better conditions for unauthorized migrants. Rick also writes on politically conscious popular music. Dr. Hesch’s principal research interest remains the ways in which Eurocentric hegemony and class power are both reproduced through policy and resisted within the state system by structurally subordinate groups and allied agents.


Shelley Jones

Shelley Jones  
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Language and Literacy Education
University of British Columbia

Shelley Jones is completing her PhD in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia.  Her dissertation, Secondary Schooling for Girls in Rural Uganda: Challenges, Opportunities and Emerging Identities, is an ethnographic case study based on data collected from a year of fieldwork (August 2004-August 2005) in a village in rural Uganda, where she worked closely with a group of 15 adolescent schoolgirls, and also taught English and adult literacy classes. Shelley has also held the position of Director of Research and Education at YouLead, a global education unit at UBC, where she has developed curriculum, led peace education programs, and developed projects and volunteer university student placements for YouLead in partnership with communities and small NGOs in East Africa. Shelley has developed/co-developed courses concerned with education/literacy and international development, and her research and teaching interests are in the areas of gender and social justice in education (with a focus on international development), literacy, and global education.

Dilek Kayaalp

Dilek Kayaalp
Ph.D. Student
Department of Educational Studies
University of British Columbia

Dilek Kayaalp received her BA and MA degrees in Sociology from the Middle East Technical University in Turkey. She is currently a PhD student in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia, Canada. Her areas of interests are immigration, anti/racism, social/educational inequality and youth culture.

Kozue Matsumoto

Kozue Matsumoto
MA Student
Educational Studies
University of British Columbia

Kozue Matsumoto is an MA student in the Department of Educational Studies. She received her BA degree in International and Cultural Studies from Tsuda College in Japan. Her research interests are in the identity construction of Japanese Canadians within and through Canadian multicultural discourses.

Harriet Mutonyi

Harriet Mutonyi
Lecturer
Uganda Martyrs University, Uganda

Harriet Mutonyi completed her PhD at UBC through the Centre for Cross Faculty Inquiry (CCFI). She recently accepted a position as a Lecturer at one of Uganda's leading universities, Uganda Martyrs University. Prior to pursuing further studies, Harriet taught secondary school in Uganda. Her areas of interest include issues of sustainable development, health/social inequities, HIV/AIDS and adolescent health, indigenous modes of communication and Education.

Constantine Ngara

Constantine Ngara
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology
University of British Columbia

Constantine Ngara is a Commonwealth sponsored doctoral candidate in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, and Special Education at UBC. Constantine has wide teaching experience from primary and secondary schools through to university (Chinhoyi University of Technology, Zimbabwe) where he trained teachers. His research agenda is to develop theories that inform gifted programming from indigenous cultural perspectives. Constantine has published several research articles and co-edited a book chapter on African views of giftedness and talent (mainly focusing on Shona and Ndebele cultures of Zimbabwe and comparative studies). His current research focuses on Shona stone sculptors’ talent attributions.

Jenipher Owuor

Jenipher Owuor
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Curriculum Studies
University of British Columbia

Jenipher Owuor is currently a doctoral candidate in the department of Curriculum Studies. Her research interests are in gender & technology, Integrating Indigenous knowledge in the current Kenyan education system, education for social justice, and diversity in education within the African context. Her dissertation focuses on illuminating Kenyan High school teachers’ perceptions of diversity in their classrooms and how this influences curriculum implementation and pedagogical strategies. Using intersectionality and critical theories, the study explores the multiple identities and factors that may inhibit or promote learning of Kenyan high school youths with the purpose of finding ways through the education system to empower them.

Mrs. Gwen Robinson

Gwen Robinson
Historian
The Chatham-Kent Black Historical Society

Gwen Robinson is a historian who volunteers as Coordinator in the Heritage Room at the Woodstock Institute Sertoma Help Centre, which provides a tremendous amount of support to the Chatham-Kent Black Historical Society, Heritage Room, a major site on the African Heritage Tour which allows tourists from all over Canada and the United States to learn more about our local African-Canadian history. In addition, Gwen has completed a videotape entitled, “Celebrate the Legacy, the Story of Chatham’s Black Community” and is presently working on the ground breaking of the B.M.E. Freedom Park and the upcoming Promised Land Project. She also has been a public speaker and presenter concerning local black history at various events over the past 30 years, including at the annual John Brown Festival/Seminar, and has authored “Seek the Truth”, the story of Chatham’s black community. This past year, Gwen was the recipient of the  “Municipality of Chatham-Kent Citizen of the Year” award.

Nilofar Shidmehr

Nilofar Shidmehr
Ph.D. Student
Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education
University of British Columbia

Nilofar Shidmehr received her degrees BA (double honors in philosophy and creative writing) and MFA in creative writing from UBC. She is currently completing her PhD in education in the Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry at UBC. She is a published author and translator both in English and in her mother tongue Farsi. Her writings have been featured in several Iranian and Canadian literary magazines and websites such as Descant, the Room of One’s Own, the Shahrvand, and Iranian.com. She has translated Tony Morrison’s book The Bluest Eye into Farsi (published by Vistar publishing house, 1997, re-printed in 2007). Her first book of poetry-novella Shirin and Salt Man will come out in spring 2008 (by Oolichan Books.) She is interested in theories of space and narrativity as they relate to identity formation. Her areas of research are diasporic and narrative spaces of identity formation. She is interested in the question of how narrativity/biographicity/translation can contribute in constructing a more viable dialogical self and function as constituting spatial practices which delimit and subvert social constructed spaces and re-arrange social power relations. She is a cultural activist, promoting narrativity as an avenue for integrating interculturalism among different communities in Canada. She strongly believes that it is possible to perpetuate a model of living in interconnectedness, which can change the very texture of locality by deterritorizing and reterritorizing place and language communities through narrativity/biographicity/translation.

Ahava Shira

Ahava Shira
Ph.D. Student
Department of Language and Literacy Education
University of British Columbia

Ahava Shira, M.Ed. is a professional facilitator, trainer & curriculum developer with extensive experience delivering gender-based violence prevention programs in secondary schools, with a particular focus on anti-oppressive, healthy relationships education. A poet, clown, storyteller and  improvisational performer, she is currently a doctoral student in the department of Language & Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia, where she is exploring the messiness of delivering violence prevention programs in complex educational contexts through autobiographical writing.

Leanne Taylor

Leanne Taylor
Ph.D Candidate
Faculty of Education
York University

Leanne Taylor is in the final stages of completing her Ph.D in the Faculty of Education at York University. She also holds a B.A. in Sociology from Queen’s University and an M.A. in Sociology from York. Her research is primarily concentrated in two interrelated fields: a) the social construction of racialized identities, particularly ‘mixed-race’ and multi-ethnic identities and (b) racial and ethnic representation in and access to education. Leanne’s Ph.D dissertation, which was supported by a SSHRC doctoral fellowship, examines ‘mixed race’ experiences in Canada as documented in autobiographies, films and documentaries. She has designed and taught two Faculty of Education foundations courses called The Adolescent and the Teacher, which explore social factors influencing youth identities and youth’s experiences in school. Leanne’s conference presentations, guest lectures, teaching and publications address a range of issues on multiracial identity, racialization in Canada, and marginalized students’ experiences in higher education.

Juliet Tembe

Juliet H Tembe
Ph.D Candidate
Department of Language and Literacy Education
University of British Columbia

Juliet Tembe graduated with a B.A in English Language Studies & Literature from Makerere University, along with a concurrent diploma in Education. After teaching English at the high school level for several years, she completed her MEd and joined the teacher education programme at Makerere University. Her research interests include: Second language teaching; language policy and planning; bilingual education; minority language education. As a member of the Association of World Education (Uganda chapter), she also has been involved in research on conflict management among pastoral communities in North eastern Uganda. She is the current chair of a non-government  AIDS service organization in Uganda: "The AIDS Support Organization (TASO)" and member of the Uganda AIDS Commission. In addition, she is a Lecturer at Islamic University in Uganda (IUIU).

Begum Verjee 2011

Begum Verjee
Ed.D (Educational Leadership and Policy, UBC)
Program Director and Core Faculty – MA in Community Psychology (MACD)
Adler School of Professional Psychology

Begum has over 25 years of experience in diversity and inter-cultural training and social justice activism. She has an interest in community engagement, community-based research and critical theories that examine power relations with the aim of critiquing and challenging social injustice. Begum has a long-standing history of developing integrative, anti-racist and anti-oppression programs in higher education, and utilizes strategies of engagement for building community in her classrooms by exploring different perspectives, lived experiences and histories. Begum’s doctoral dissertation at UBC examined the development of service-learning from a critical race feminist perspective.

Begum has sat on numerous Boards and Committees – she has been a member of the City of Vancouver Women's Task Force, member of the Advisory Committee on Diversity Issues for the City of Vancouver, and is currently appointed to the Employment and Income Assistance Tribunal with the Province of British Columbia. Begum is also a member of the Steering Committee with the Canadian Alliance for Community Service-Learning.

Begum has been involved in qualitative research and consultation projects, in both higher education and public service sectors, in examining barriers experienced by Aboriginal people, women and people of colour. Begum is currently the program director and core faculty for the MA in Community Psychology at the Adler School of Professional Psychology, Vancouver Campus.

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UBC ASSOCIATE CENTRES, DEPARTMENTS & OFFICES• • •

CCIE collaborates with a number of UBC Centres, Departments & Offices in order to foster intellectual exchange and collaboration and to build university-community partnerships. These include the following:

The Network of Centres and Institutes in Education (NCIE) - CCIE is part of The Network of Centres and Institutes in Education at UBC, which was created in 2002 by the Faculty of Education Dean, Dr. Rob Tierney. It brings several research centres and institutes under one administrative umbrella within the faculty. While each centre/institute in NCIE has its own unique mandate, purpose, and focus, their common features have served to bring them together. In this sense, the Network may be seen as a "generative space" where faculty and graduate students come together around sets of shared research interests and problems that often transcend departmental boundaries. To find out more about an individual centre, click relevant link below.

 

David Lam Chair in Multicultural EducationIn addition to founding CCIE, Director, Dr. Handel Kashope Wright, is the current David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education. The David Lam Chair is an endowed Chair established by the Honourable David Lam, former Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia, and the Governments of British Columbia and Canada. The Chair enables the Faculty of Education to provide leadership in research, teaching, and application of knowledge about multicultural education. For more information, go to: multicultural.educ.ubc.ca

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Indigenous Education Office CCIE has collaborated with the Associate Dean for Indigenous Education on a number of symposia and events. The Associate Dean for Indigenous Education provides leadership and coordination efforts regarding Indigenous education and research. In particular, this position oversees the existing Indigenous programs, NITEP and Ts’kel; works with Faculty departments, centres, and programs to establish Indigenous education priorities, new initiatives and effective research networks; builds Indigenous community-university partnerships; and expands the pool of excellent people working cooperatively to advance Indigenous education and research.

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UBC Okanagan Cultural Studies Program – CCIE has formed an association with the Cultural Studies program at UBC Okanagan, which is a new undergraduate program that was approved by UBC Okanagan’s Senate and Board of Governors this past year. The program is located in the Department of Creative and Critical Studies and allows students to take cultural studies courses, along with courses from other disciplines like English, Sociology, Indigenous Studies, Women’s Studies, etc,  that flow within the following three streams: 1)  Media Studies draws from studies of communications, film, and television to examine how different forms of representation alter being whether in print, film, television, Internet, or emergent digital technologies. 2) Global Cultural Studies examines the impact of colonialism and globalization on forms of cultural production and representation, transnational cultural relationships, and the formation of local and global identities 3) Critical and Cultural Theory provides an interdisciplinary theoretical framework for the study of cultural production, representation, and practices in consideration of effects on class, ethnicity, race, nationality, gender, sexuality, and power.

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UBC Equity Office The UBC Equity Office is a strong supporter of CCIE initiatives and has collaborated with the Centre on a number of occasions. The Equity Office works, more generally, to prevent discrimination and harassment on campus, to provide procedures for handling complaints and to coordinate UBC's employment and educational equity program. The Office also helps educate members of the UBC community about their rights and responsibilities. Workshops and training sessions for students, staff and faculty on issues such as discrimination and harassment, equity and diversity are offered regularly and are available on request.

 

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UBC FACULTY ASSOCIATES• • •

 

Dr. David Anderson

David Anderson
Associate Professor
Department of Curriculum Studies

David Anderson is an Associate Professor within the Department of Curriculum Studies. His research over the last 18 years has focused on the fields of science education and museum-based learning with an emphasis visitor experiences in informal contexts. Dr Anderson has assisted numerous museum-based institutions internationally. Most recently he has been involved in studies of young children's behavior and learning in museum settings, visitors' long term memories of museum experiences, the relationships between metacognition and the quality of learning emergent from science museum experiences and reforming traditional models of teacher education. Some of Dr. Anderson's recent publications include articles in such journal as Memory, Teacher Education, and Curator.

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Dr. Hartej Gill

Hartej Gill
Assistant Professor
Department of Educational Studies

Hartej Gill has recently joined the Educational Administration Faculty in the Department of Educational Studies at UBC. She is particularly interested in Social Justice and Leadership and in using research to bridge the gap between theory, practice, and social activism. At the core of her work is the goal of provoking critical dialogues about identity, power, systemic oppression. colonialism, patriarchy and modernity etc.  From her professorship position designated by EADM as a scholar-practitioner, she hopes to use her praxis as way of co-creating transformative and reciprocal relationships between universities, public schools, and the larger community. 

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Dr. Rosalin Hanna

Rosalin Hanna
Executive Director
Aboriginal Women’s Health and Healing Research Group

Rosalin Hanna is the Executive Director of Aboriginal Women’s Health and Healing Research Group (AWHHRG). The AWHHRG is a national network of First Nations, Métis and Inuit women researchers interested in community-based research focused on the health of Aboriginal women, their families and communities and is situated at the University of British Columbia within the College of Health Disciplines. Dr. Hanna is Nlha7kápmx and a member of Lytton First Nation, British Columbia. She completed her Education, Doctoral Degree, Curriculum and Instruction, major Exercise Science, and her Graduate Certificate in Non-Profit Management at the University of Central Florida. Dr. Hanna’s dissertation research topic was the “Attainment of Doctoral Degree for American Indian and Alaska Native Women”. She has also written other papers on Attainment of Education to Advance Aboriginal Leaders (2007), and the Importance of Aboriginal Sport in Canada (2006).

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Dr. David Jefferess

David Jefferess
Assistant Professor
Department of Critical Studies

David Jefferess is an Assistant Professor of English and Cultural Studies in the Department of Critical Studies, UBC Okanagan. His primary teaching and research areas include postcolonial studies, global cultural studies, and peace studies. His first book, Postcolonial Resistance: Culture, Liberation, and Transformation was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2007. David has also published articles on child rights, development agency marketing, anti-globalization dissent, and African literature. His current research focuses upon discourses of responsibility and the construction of the "human" in contemporary discourses of globalization and global justice.

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Dr. Daniel Keyes

Daniel Keyes
Assistant Professor
Department of Critical Studies

Daniel Keyes is an Assistant Professor at UBC Okanagan where he is the chair of the Cultural Studies undergraduate program. His research explores the intersection between media and performance and is informed by his dissertation on the performance of testimonials on daytime talk shows in the mid-1990. Recent research focuses on a) filmic representation of the first Gulf War and b) the problematic expressions of cultural nationalism in 1950s theatre and pageant productions in the Okanagan in terms of the production of whiteness and emergent Canadian nationalism.

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Dr. Carmen Medina

Carmen L. Medina
Assistant Professor
Department of Language & Literacy Education


Carmen L. Medina is an assistant professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at University of British Columbia. Her research focuses in the areas of critical literacy, literacy/biliteracy and identity, Latino/children’s literature, drama education and cultural studies. She is interested in how people construct identities as they negotiate multiple literacies and discourses through imaginative practices. Her work has been published in journals such as: Research in Drama in Education, Language Arts, Theory into Practice and Journal of Teacher Education among others. In 2005 she was awarded the Virginia Hamilton Award for a journal article that made a significant contribution to the field of multicultural literature with young people.

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Dr. Samson Nashon

Samson Madera Nashon
Assistant Professor
Department of Curriculum Studies

Samson Nashon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Curriculum Studies. His research focuses on ways of teaching and learning, focusing on students’ alternative understandings that have roots in cultural backgrounds. His most recent studies include High school science in BC: The status of Physics 12, The nature of analogies that Kenyan high school teachers use in explaining physics concepts, Accessing science and mathematics course offerings: A case of rural BC high schools, and the ongoing Metacognition and reflective inquiry (MRI): Understanding learning across contexts. Currently, Dr. Nashon is involved in research projects that include investigation into African students’ ways of knowing in science discourses. His work is featured in numerous journals including Science Education, Journal of Physics Teacher Education Online, and Research In Science Education, among others.

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Dr. Bonny Norton

Bonny Norton
Professor and Distinguished University Scholar
Department of Language and Literacy Education

Bonny Norton is Professor and Distinguished University Scholar in the Department of Language and Literacy Education, University of British Columbia, Canada. She is also Honorary Professor in Applied English Language Studies, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, and Visiting Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education, King's College, University of London. Her award-winning research addresses identity and language learning, education and development, and critical literacy. Recent publications include Identity and Language Learning (Longman/Pearson, 2000); Gender and English Language Learners (TESOL, 2004, w. A. Pavlenko); and Critical Pedagogies and Language Learning (Cambridge University Press, 2004, w. K. Toohey). She edited the 1997 special issue of TESOL Quarterly on "Language and Identity," and co-edited (w. Y. Kanno) the 2003 > special issue of the Journal of Language, Identity, and Education on "Imagined Communities and Educational Possibilities." In 2003, she was awarded a UBC Killam Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

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Dr. Dalene Swanson

Dalene Swanson
SSHRC Postdoctoral Scholar & UBC Sessional Instructor
Department of Curriculum Studies

Dalene M. Swanson is a SSHRC postdoctoral scholar at the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Education. She completed her Ph.D. in Curriculum Studies and Mathematics Education at UBC and was awarded four prominent international and Canadian awards for her research. Dalene’s research interests span curriculum studies; critical theory and pedagogy; cultural studies; indigeneity; mathematics education; teacher education; arts-based approaches to teaching, learning and inquiry; and social, ecological and global justice. In her teaching and research, Dalene affords her work a strong critical, anti-oppressive and democratic focus. She embraces alternative methodologies towards decolonizing practices in research, teaching and learning. Research emphases have included a focus on the critical relationship between social difference discourses, identity and constructed disadvantage. In this sense, her research attends critically to the subjective intersections of race, class, gender, poverty, ethnicity, ableism, language and cultural differences, and other social difference discourses, towards contesting oppression, co-creating transformative and empowering discourses and practices, and advocating for participatory citizenship ‘glocally.’

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