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Events

CONFERENCES
SYMPOSIA
TOWN HALL

CCIE PRESENTATIONS
CO-SPONSORED EVENTS

BOOK LAUNCHES

Black Pioneers

Shady Creek Churchyard plaque in memory of the Alexander family

 


BLACK BRITISH COLUMBIANS:
Race, Space and the Historical Politics of Difference at the US/Canada Border

St. John’s College, UBC, 2111 Lower Mall MAP
APRIL 11-12, 2012

PROGRAM

REGISTRATION
April 11 8:00 am
St. John’s College, Social Lounge

April 12 8:30 am
St. John’s College, Lecture Hall

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Jean Barman
Afua Cooper
Cynthia Dillard
Crawford Kilian

This conference on Black British Columbians is a collaboration between The University of British Columbia’s Centre for Culture, Identity and Education and the Promised Land Community-University Research Project. It brings together prominent community historians, youth activists and academics to address issues such as Black trajectories including the links between movements within Canada, and historical and contemporary US/ Canada border crossings; the lives and works of prominent male and female Black Pioneers; the significance of the African Rifles; interracial relationships, multiracial identities and the politics of difference in historical BC and the curious marginalization of the historical and contemporary presence of Blackness in present day conceptualizations of British Columbia. This conference is intended to highlight the historical and contemporary presence of Blacks in British Columbia, a presence that tends to be relegated to being an “absent presence.”

 

Pirelli Multicultural Monument

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE: MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
Delta Vancouver Airport Hotel, 3500 Cessna Drive, Richmond, BC
APRIL 20-23, 2009

We Too Are “ IDLE NO MORE”: UBC’s Non-Indigenous Scholars and the Politics of Engaging Indigeneity
Monday, May 27, 8:30am - 6:30pm, Sty-Wet-Tan Hall, First Nations House of Learning
PROGRAM
RSVP
Welcome: Elder Larry Grant.
Opening Plenary Panel: Blye Frank, Dean of Education and Jo-ann Archibald, Associate Dean of Indigenous Education.
Closing Plenary Panel: Anna Kindler, Vice Provost, Academic and Linc Kesler, Senior Advisor to President on Aboriginal Affairs.

• • •

Dr. Tracey Lindberg Dr. Sherene Razack Dr. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

UBC's Centre for Culture, Identity & Education (CCIE) and Centre for Race, Autobiography, Gender and Age Studies (RAGA) present
Social Justice Praxis
: Theory, Research and Activism on Campus and in the Community

March 3, 2011 Venue: St. John’s College Social Lounge Map
All other events at UBC First Nations Longhouse, Sty-Wet-Tan (Big Hall), 1985 West Mall. Map

MARCH 3, 2011 2-5 PM – Indigenous Praxis and World Majority Peoples Identity Politics
Keynote Speaker: Tracey Lindberg, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies, Athabasca University.

MARCH 17, 2011 2-5 PM – Anti-racism and Critical Race Feminist Theory
Keynote Speaker: Sherene Razack, Professor, Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, University of Toronto.


MARCH 24, 2011 2-5 PM – Service Learning for Social Justice and Cultural Studies Praxis
Keynote Speaker: Awad Ibrahim, Associate Professor of Education, University of Ottawa.


APRIL 3, 2011 NOON -3 PM – Postcolonialism and Critical Pedagogy
Keynote Speaker: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University.

• • •

Rethinking Youth Culture and Identity
June 3rd, 2008, 8:30-5:45pm, Scarfe Building, Faculty of Education, Room 1211
Organized by Dr. Yvonne Hébert (University of Calgary) and Dr. Handel Wright (UBC)

Even in these postmodern times identity continues to be the site of intense work on the part of youth and scholars. This symposium explored new ways of looking at youth as phenomenon, thinking about youth activity and identity formation, examining linkages with cultural policies and/or other forms of civic pluralism, so as to better understand contemporary realities of young peoples lives and future directions of youth studies.

Youth Research Symposium
Wednesday, April 2nd, 9:00am-6:00pm, St. John's College, Social Lounge
Organized by the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education and sponsored by the University of Cambridge, UK

The Youth Research Symposium showcased the role of interdisciplinary research in rethinking conceptualizations of ‘marginalized’ youth identity’, debates on youth subcultures versus post-subcultures, issues of gender, sexuality and social exclusion, and the history of policing and surveillance of young bodies over time and across national spaces.  In particular, it sought to understand more fully how ideas about childhood and new youth identities have been generated and framed in different temporal, cultural and spatial contexts. The symposium also explored how the formation of new youth cultures may function, and to what degree, both as a response to, and a complex connection between, the macro and micro cultural forces of social and temporal change in the late 20th century and early 21st century.ancipation.

Indigenous knowledge and the environment - A day-long Symposium
Friday, Nov. 23rd, 2007 from 8:30-4pm at Ponderosa Centre, Arbutus & Dogwood Rooms
Organized and co-sponsored by the Pacific Peoples' Partnership, the Koutu Nui of the Cook Islands, the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, the David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education, and the Indigenous Education Institute of Canada

This full day symposium offered perspectives on the global environmental crisis from the lens of Indigenous knowledges. The diversity and plurality of Indigenous ways of knowing (traditional, academic, scientific and activist) was used to explore the impact of climate change on Indigenous communities, from the Cook Islands to Vancouver Island, as well as what constitutes Indigenous environmentalist responses at various sites and across different academic disciplines (e.g. anthropology, education, health sciences).  The plenary panel, “Shifting Tides: Indigenous Responses to Global Climate Change” was composed of Indigenous figures from Pacific Peoples’ Partnership, Vancouver Island and the Koutu Nui of the Cook Islands.  Other panels, which included UBC faculty, visiting scholars, the UBC Environment Caucus and graduate student representatives addressed “Indigeneity, Environmentalism and the Disciplines” and  “More Environmentalisms” (i.e. not necessarily Indigenous) .  An Aboriginal scholar from Australia drew on Australian Aboriginal communities’ experiences to provide the symposium’s concluding statement. Click here for a full schedule of events.

• • •

Multiculturalism With(out) Guarantees: The Anti-Racism Alternative - A day-long Symposium
April 2 , 2007 - 8:30 - 4:15pm in St. John's College, Social Lounge
Organized by Dr. Handel Kashope Wright and sponsored by UBC Associate Vice President of Equity, Tom Patch, and the UBC Equity Office, The David Lam Chair for Multicultural Education, the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE).

This day long symposium brought together UBC faculty, students and administers, along with leading experts in the field and members of the local community in order to explore both the possibilities and limitations of integrative anti-racism as an alternative discourse to multiculturalism. The symposium opened with remarks by UBC Associate Vice President, Tom Patch and CCIE Director & David Lam Chair, Dr. Handel Kashope Wright. This was followed by a key note address by Professor George Sefa Dei, who offered some critical points in theorizing “integrative anti-racism," as well as drew attention to the pressing need for new questions. Dr. Leslie Roman then provided a response paper in which she spoke about the importance of relational genealogies as a crucial component of integrative anti-racism. In addition, the symposium featured panels on the intersection of indigeneity and anti-racism; anti-racist teacher education and classroom practice; UBC administration’s anti-racism efforts; and faculty and staff anti-racism activism.

Keynote Address: Professor George Dei. Response to the Keynote Address: Dr. Leslie Roman

• • •

African Education: Worldviews, Ways of Knowing & Pedagogy
November 24, 2006, 8:30 am - 4:30 pm in Neville Scarfe 310, 308A and 304
Organized by Drs. Samson Nashon, David Anderson and Handel Kashope Wright
and sponsored by and conducted through The David Lam Chair for Multicultural Education
and the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE).

This one-day symposium brought together leading and emerging scholars and experts who have undertaken research in areas that in one way or the other lend to understanding of the African learner. The central aim of the symposium was to examine African worldviews, ways of knowing and pedagogy, which shape African students’ knowledge construction processes and which in many respects are unique and in other respects have similarities with the Western paradigm of the education process. To this end, presenters at the symposium drew on their experience and research in African contexts to elucidate these culturally rooted constructs.  This was done both in the form of formal paper presentation sessions which were followed by group discussions based on themes congruous with symposium focus, and through a keynote address.  The keynote speaker was Professor Ali Abdi, who presented a paper on the problematic relationship between African world views and their attendant educational and epistemological system on the one hand, and the dominant European discourses that have attempted to negate the validity of those, both in historical and contemporary Africa, on the other.  Professor Abdi’s paper was preceded by a response from Professor Kogila Adam-Moodley, which was followed by a presentation by Dr. Yvonne Brown on policy issues pertaining to Africa.  The afternoon was comprised largely of group discussions which provided participants with a unique opportunity to share experiences and perspectives with the guidance and input of Africans and Africanists.

Keynote Address: Professor Ali Abdi. Response to the Keynote Address: Professor Kogila Adam-Moodley.

• •

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TOWN HALL

Exploring and Promoting Multiculturalism and Related Discourses
March 23, 2006 1:30-3:00 pm in Neville Scarfe 310
Organized by Dr. Handel Kashope Wright through The David Lam Chair for Multicultural Education and the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE) with the support of the Faculty of Education’s Network of Centres and Institutes in Education (NCIE).

This town hall served as an exploratory and planning meeting on multiculturalism and related discourses and brought together UBC faculty and graduate students from such research areas as multiculturalism, anti-racism, interculturalism, transnationalism, cosmopolitanism, cultural studies, social cohesion and identity/identification politics. The purpose of the town hall was to share research projects and interests, plan activities, identify potential collaborators in multiculturalism and related discourses.   In addition to the general discussion that took place, the town hall featured three guest presenters:  Professor Peter Seixas, Canadian Research Chair and Director of the Centre for Study of Historical Consciousness, who spoke on his current SSHRC project, “Benchmarks of Historical Literacy.”  Karen Rolston and Jack Lee from the Centre for Intercultural Language Studies, who  discussed  “town/gown” work, and Yvonne Brown, who presented on “African and Diaspora Literature for Children Project.

• • •

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CCIE PRESENTATIONS

Professor Mikko Lehtonen

New Reading? Ruptures and Continuities: A Lecture
Thursday, November 29, 2012, noon-2 pm
Professor Mikko Lehtonen, Media Culture, University of Tempere, Finland

Ponderosa F Room 203, 2044 Lower Mall
The lecture is based on a recently concluded research project, "New reading communities, new ways of reading," that gathered fresh knowledge on how young people in Finland actually read today. The lecture looks at the dominant, residual and emergent values of reading in late modern societies and cultures. These values are then compared to how and what the "Google generation" actually reads. The project results show that there are some significant ruptures in ways of reading, but that there are also some perhaps surprising continuities as well. The dominant idea that print media is used for "serious" reading and other forms of media are used mainly for entertainment seems quite problematic in the light of the results.

Kaela Jubas

WATCH AND LEARN: Culture as Pedagogy on Work and Identity in the Health Care Sector
January 24, 2012, 12:30 pm
RSVP
Neville Scarfe 310 2125 Main Mall Map
In this talk, Professor Jubas will discuss findings from a two-year study exploring the pedagogical functions of popular culture. The qualitative study involved two phases. Phase 1 analyzes two American television shows featuring medical residents (Grey’s Anatomy and Scrubs). In phase 2, conversations were held with undergraduate nursing and medical students in Canada (Victoria/Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto) who were familiar with one or both of these shows. The textual analysis from the first phase was helpful in developing a series of questions focused on three themes: identity, ethics and learning/pedagogy. Excerpts from the shows framed discussions with participants about how they related the shows’ portrayals and messages about professional identity, learning and work to their educational programs and experiences. In other words, Kaela explored how watching a group of fictional characters navigate the transitions from learner to worker, youth to adult, novice to professional helps audience members move through similar transitions. For this presentation, she will concentrate on identity-related learning, particularly on how gender figures in portrayals and experiences of health care education and work, and in professional identity construction.

   
Prof. Goli Rezai-Rashti December 8, 2011 CCIE and the Department of Educational Studies (EDST)
Women and Higher Education in Iran:
Negotiating Between Modernity and Tradition

Thursday, December 8, 2011, noon-1:30 pm
Ponderosa G Lounge, 2044 Lower Mall
M A P
Professor Goli Rezai-Rashti, University of Western Ontario
   
Kris Rutten's presentation Nationalism as Identification and Division

CCIE
Nationalism as Identification and Division

Introducing Rhetorical Analysis in the Teacher Education Curriculum

December 2, 2010, 1:00 pm
Neville Scarfe 310 2125 Main Mall Map
CO-SPONSORED BY: The Centre for the Study of Teacher Education (CSTE)
In this presentation Dr. Rutten discusses what we can learn from ‘new rhetoric‘ (focusing on the work of the American rhetorician Kenneth Burke [1897-1993]) about (national) identity and explores how nationalism can be taught from such a rhetorical perspective. Despite the ‘deconstruction’ of Nation(alism) as a Grand Narrative and its relation to education, there is a new tendency towards emphasizing national identity, caused by trends such as globalization and multiculturalism. In the language and literature teaching curriculum, this paradoxical situation often causes friction for teachers who are very often expected to teach standard language and national literature. Dr. Rutten’s claim is that rhetoric is a possible tool to deal with these tensions in the curriculum. He will focus on the rhetorical construction of Flanders, Belgium as a case-study and will argue that Burke’s concepts are useful tools to make students ‘symbol-wise’: to understand the way national symbols work, and to develop critical engagement with, as well as on behalf of, those symbols.

   
Forghani-Arani-poster-thumbnail

Intercultural Competence and Pedagogical Tact: Teachers’ Narratives of Handling Cultural Diversity
July 26, 2010, 12:30-2:00 pm
*** Room changed to 209 ***
CO-SPONSORED BY: Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, Centre for the Study of Teacher Education (CSTE)

A presentation by Dr. Neda Forghani-Arani, Research Associate and Lecturer, Education and Human Development Dept. University of Vienna, Austria
Cultural change has emerged as an important issue due to increased international migration. As a direct result, cross-cultural competence has become an indispensable element in the repertoire of pedagogic competencies of teachers. Whereas the study of intercultural or cross-cultural competence has been mainly oriented toward behavioral skills, traits, attitudes and culture specific knowledge, Dr. Forghani-Arani will attempt to re-define the concept of pedagogical intercultural competence by drawing German pedagogy, namely the theoretical construct of pedagogical tact as introduced and elaborated by J.F. Herbart in the early 1800s. Drawing on data from work studying the lived experience of teachers in Austrian public schools, she take a closer look at the phenomenon of cultural otherness and foreignness as it is lived and experienced by teachers in their daily interactions with migrant children and their parents.
By extending the construct of tact to take account of pedagogical situations which take place in an intercultural context, and by introducing the construct of tact into the recent discourse on intercultural competence, she hopes to investigate a new and so far unexplored dimension of culture and change in education.

   

Visceral Cosmopolitanism: From Alterity to Mere Difference
July 12, 2010, 12:30-2:00 pm
CO-SPONSORED BY:
Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education (CCFI), and the Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum Studies (CSICS)

A presentation by Mica Nava, Professor of Cultural Studies and Co-director of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of East London, England
Mica Nava will discuss some of the conceptual and historical issues raised in her book Visceral Cosmopolitanism: Gender, Culture and the Normalisation of Difference. This focuses mainly on the UK twentieth century metropolitan experience and, as the title suggests, in contrast to most theoretical work on cosmopolitanism, is concerned not with universal rights or the ‘intellectual and aesthetic openness’ and ‘detachment’ of the global traveller, but with cosmopolitanism as a structure of feeling and a transgenerational habitus – as an empathetic, inclusive and sometime eroticised range of feelings and attitudes towards others, otherness and the foreign – which finds expression in vernacular and domestic forms as well as in commerce, social science and the arts.

 

Making of a Perfect Storm: the Unruly Salon

FREE PUBLIC PREMIÈRE OF THE SHORT FILM: The Making of a Perfect Storm: The Unruly Salon

Tuesday, MARCH 3, 2009
The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, 6265 Crescent Road, UBC
   
Black History Month

BLACK HISTORY MONTH FEBRUARY 2009
St. John's College Social Lounge, 2111 Lower Mall, UBC MAP

FEBRUARY 5 4-6 pm – Dr. George Dei
Pan-Africanism Revisited: Pedagogic & Political Possibilities of Social Mobilization

FEBRUARY 12 12-2 pm – Dr. Annette Henry
'Taking Space': Reflections on 20 years of Doing Black Feminist Research in Education

FEBRUARY 19 12-2 pm – Dr. Boulou de B’béri
The Politics of Knowledge: The Promised Land Project and/as (Black) Canadian Social History

FEBRUARY 26 12-2 pm – Dr. Afua Cooper
150 Years of Collective Black History in British Columba: 1858-2008

   
High Anxiety

High Anxiety? An exploration of the pedagogy of difference
and the body in popular Hollywood film

Dr. Andrew Thornton – Roehampton University, London UK
August 5, 2008, noon to 2 pm, Neville Scarfe 310

In this presentation Dr. Thornton aims to explore the seemingly self-aware and ironic, even postmodern, construction of the imagery of the heroic body in popular Hollywood film. This oft repeated imagery arguably reinforces a series of retrograde notions of gender, race, and sexuality. However, Andrew will also highlight how much of this imagery also reflects a deep cultural anxiety concerning the dissolution of dominant hierarchies of identity and difference. Or in other terms popular films seems to be the site of an attempt to stabilize dominant identities and are not a celebration of difference. Examples are drawn primarily from recent ‘blockbuster’ films: The Fantastic Four, The Incredibles and Batman Begins. The concern is to draw attention to the visual economies and cultural logics that appear to underpin and organize the making and animating of filmic bodies. Or in other terms, he aims to explore the pedagogy of difference and embodiment in popular film. As well, Dr. Thornton will draw attention to the ways in which the imagery and symbolism of the sporting body seem to be central to the intelligibility of the ‘heroic’ body in popular Hollywood film.

Writing in English: an act of mimicry or betrayal—a discontinuous presencing of borderlines
Arpil 18 th , 2008, 12:30-2:30pm, Scarfe 310, Faculty of Education
Organized by the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education and the David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education

Book Launch for: Shirin and Salt Man /  by Nilofar Shidmehr
ISBN 978-088982-246-7 • 160 pp • $17.95 • pb • April 2008 • Poetic Novella
Shirin and Salt Man is a novella in verse, which tells the story of a young modern day Iranian woman, Shirin. She is an ordinary girl from Kermanshah born before the Islamic Revolution, who imagines herself to be an incarnation of princess Shirin, depicted in the ancient Persian classic Shirin and Khosro. At first she tries to shape her life to that of the myth, but later decides to change her destiny and become the author of her own story. She leaves her husband and runs away with the Salt Man, a 1700 year old mummy on display at the Iranian National Museum in Tehran. The poems form a compelling narrative of the life of a contemporary Iranian woman whose voice has been muted by Khosro, her fundamentalist and traditional husband. In an environment where the dominance of men is written in stone and where only men have the authority for fashioning and telling stories, Shirin reclaims a place for herself as a lover and teller of stories. She re-enters life through cracks of narrative to invent Shirin anew, one whose life-path radically diverges from that of her namesake, Shirin of Nezami’s story. She digs out Farhad, the mythical lover of princess Shirin, who has now become the Salt Man, from under the dust and stones of history and she gives him another opportunity to love her. In transforming Salt Man to another Farhad, Shirin creates a new history—one shaped and narrated by a feminine voice.

Biography
Nilofar Shidmehr was born and raised in Iran, and has lived in Canada since 1997. She holds an MFA degree in creative writing from the University of British Columbia and is currently working on her PhD at the Center for Cross Faculty Inquiry in Education. Nilofar is the translator of Toni Morrison’s novel The Bluest Eye (Vistar Publishers: Tehran, 1997, reprinted in 2007). Her work has been featured in both Iranian and Canadian literary magazines, including Descant, A Room of One's Own, West Coast Line, Galleon, and the Shahrvand, a widely-read Iranian newspaper published in Toronto and Vancouver.Nilofar believes the way to understand the dilemma which is Iran, is through reading and connecting to the intimate stories that reflect Iranians’ lives. She is hoping that, through her writing, she can share these insights with her readers.

• • •

Metropole: A Film Screening & Conversation with Directors
March 12th , 2008, 12:15-2:00pm, Faculty of Education, Scarfe 2415
Organized by Centre for Culture, Identity and Education

CCIE was pleased to feature a showing of the feature documentary, METROPOLE, a visual essay that explores the everyday dimensions of social class in urban North America. Both the film producer, Stephanie Skourtes (UBC), and the film writer, Brian Ganter (University of Washington), are CCIE associates. A visual exploration of the daily flux of life, labor, and leisure in a global city over one 24-hour period, as experienced by persons from across the social spectrum, METROPOLE contains no dialogue. Instead, it uses only images, sounds, and music to express the everyday and seemingly mundane moments of a unique, yet familiar, reality. The documentary follows six individuals as they go about their day from morning to night—through leisure time, home, and work. What at first appear to be unrelated, individual actions are connected by the complex economic and social relationships inherent to an urban consumer culture that compartmentalizes human activity. By combining beautiful cinematography, with an original, poetic musical score composed by Michael Hebert the complexity of our interdependence with one another in a post-modern economic climate is revealed. The purpose of the documentary is to highlight the contrasting social positions of consumer versus producer, positions that we all occupy, and to defamiliarize the everyday activities of work and rest. METROPOLE takes the seemingly disconnected interactions of our daily lives in order to mark them, label them and display them as something striking, something that calls for explanation, not to be taken for granted, not just natural. Visit www.metropolethemovie.com for more information.

DIRECTOR'S BIOS:

Stephanie Skourtes (Co-Director and Producer) is a self-taught independent filmmaker and educator. With an established academic background in sociology she moved into media production in 2000 with the desire to create aesthetically and politically conscious films and videos infused with a sociological understanding of everyday phenomena. Stephanie completed her first feature documentary project in 2003 that she wrote, directed, and produced titled, Growing Up a Mother. It follows the lives of three teenage mothers and their babies. A community outreach campaign accompanied this film resulting in numerous screenings around the country and wide distribution in educational markets nationally and internationally. Stephanie currently resides in Vancouver, BC where she is pursuing a PhD in Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia. Her research utilizes visual ethnographic methods to study female youth subcultures with a focus on the cultural politics of urban spaces.

Brian Ganter (Co-Director and Writer) Brian Ganter is a filmmaker, cultural critic and teacher whose areas of research include Marxist social and cultural theory. He has published and spoken on the politics of representation in film and new media in a number of international journals, invited forums, and conferences. His work centers on matters of social justice and radical political praxis in the arenas of class, race, and gender especially in the wake of globalization and the new ‘global’ U.S.-led imperialism. Brian has studied media theory and film production at various universities in New York and he is currently a PhD candidate in English at the University of Washington, Seattle.

• • •

 

Hello Kitty: the Work of Nature in the Age of Digital Communication
Dr. Jody Berland, York University, Canada
Monday, Nov. 19th, 2007 from 12:30-2pm at Ponderosa Centre, Cedar Room (Directions)
Organized by the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, and the David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education

This presentation addressed the increasing visibility of animals in contemporary image culture.  Berland argued that it is ironic and poignant that such images are so closely aligned with the signs and practices of technoculture.  Her presentation examined some of these images and commented on them as pedagogical events conveying paradoxical messages about the relationship between human beings and nature.  Specifically, Berland focused on the relationship between young people and cell phones, a subject of interest to corporate planners, educators, and parents alike, with a growing body of research emerging to address it.  In order to do so, she took as her starting point the current advertising campaign using pictures of animals to market cell phones and other mobile digital communication devices. Her strategy was to resituate the relationship as a form of triangulation: human, animal, phone. Why do young people connect to animals via phones, or to their cell phones via pictures of animals? What are the implications of this ménage a trois?  She offered a “reading” of this campaign and then proceeded to critique the limits of such analysis. Her central argument was that teaching and learning in cultural studies needs to elaborate and complicate its perimeters to accommodate the challenges of both cell phone culture and environmental crisis.

• • •

Creating a Multicultural Nation: The Educational Role of Media
Professor  Ien Ang, University of Western Sydney, Australia
Tuesday, Oct. 30th, 2007 from 12:30-2pm at Ponderosa Centre, Arbutus Room
Organized by the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, and the David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education

How can the media play a constructive role in promoting the creation of a multicultural nation? This talk drew on Ang's extensive publications on cultural studies, audience reception and multiculturalism, as well as her practical experience as a researcher working with Australia’s Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) to develop a pedagogy based on an understanding of multiculturalism that extends beyond identity politics and political correctness. In Australia and elsewhere, SBS broadcasting practice suggests that relations among nations, media, and multiculturalism have to be engaged as sites of contestation at the levels of the social, the educational, and the cultural.

• • •

Teaching Whiteness in a Multicultural Context and Color-blind Era - Dr. Zeus Leonardo, University of California, Berkeley
Thursday, Sept. 27th, 2007 from 12:30-2pm in Ponderosa, Cedar Room
Organized by the Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, and the David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education

This presentation centered around the critical theme of whiteness. Since the innovation of whiteness studies within the multicultural literature in the late 1980s, the question of "What to do with whiteness?" has been posed. There are two principal strategies for dealing with the politics of whiteness: White reconstructionism and White abolitionism. White reconstructionism is arguably a strategy of reinventing whiteness in hopes of rescuing its anti-oppressive dimensions. In white abolitionism, there is no hope in whiteness and the strategy is to locate it, insist that whites disidentify with it, and thereby commit race treason. This presentation appraised the conceptual and strategic understanding of whiteness through the prisms of white reconstructionism and abolitionism.

• • •

Multiculturality, Multiculturalism and the Phenomenon of Cross-Cultural and Interfaith Marriage in Canada and the United States
June 2, 2007 9:00-11:00am, MY Place Scotia Creek Lounge, Whistler BC
Organized by The Whistler Interface Society

In this keynote address paper, Dr. Wright explores the phenomenon of cross-cultural and interface marriage in Canada and the United States. In particular, Dr. Wright challenges the assumption that cross-cultural and interfaith marriage is a new phenomenon. Instead, Dr. Wright argues that there is a long history of mixed relationships and biracial offspring in Canadian and BC history. But Dr. Wright does agree that today there are several differences in the current phenomenon: people of different backgrounds meet more easily now due to increased diversity in neighborhoods and workplaces, mixed raced couples are more accepted both by their families and by society, and "mixed raced" is more frequently and easily claimed as an identity.

• • •

Youth and Media: Literacies Old and New – Dr. Michael Hoechsmann, McGill University
May 31st , 2007 12:30–2:00pm in Neville Scarfe 310
Organized by The David Lam Chair for Multicultural Education and The Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE)

This paper focused on how changes in access to technology have facilitated new conditions for young people to shoot, cut and mix multimodal texts, and the emergence of the Internet as ’home theater’ for a global audience has enabled youth to communicate across borders and across the street. Using a cultural studies approach to youth and media, Dr. Hoechsmann argues that differing conceptions of audience -  incorporated into the act of media creation - produce different outcomes, that there are strong residual communicational and cultural elements in contemporary “participatory” media production, and that as young people are drawn into new forms of media practice, they draw substantially on a pre-existing repertoire of cultural meanings. Dr. Hoechsmann contexutalized these claims in relation to his research on Web 2.0 applications, community youth media organizations, school-based media education and youth participation in the traditional new media. Go to media to view his presentation.

• • •

Changing Nature of Australian Multiculturalism and its Implications for Ethnic Minorities and Education: Critical Reflections  – Dr. Siri Gamage, University of New England, Australia
October  11, 2006 12:00–1:30pm in Neville Scarfe 308A
Organized by The David Lam Chair for Multicultural Education and The Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE)

This paper focused on how Australian multiculturalism and associated political discourses and policies have undergone substantial changes in emphasis and direction in the last decade compared to the previous decades under the liberal-nation federal government.  In particular, the paper outlined the nature of these changes and their implications for ethnic minorities and multicultural education as well as for co-existence in a harmonious society.  The paper also addressed the shift in emphasis on multiculturalism as compared to Australianness (citizenship).

• • •

Identity Conversion, Citizenship, and Social Studies: Asian-Australian Perspectives on Indigenous Reconciliation and Human Rights – Professor Michael Singh, University of Western Sydney, Australia
March 22, 2006 1:00–2:15pm in Neville Scarfe 308A

Organized by Dr. Handel Kashope Wright and sponsored by The Department of Educational Studies, The David Lam Chair for Multicultural Education, The Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE) and The Office of the Associate Dean of Indigenous Education.

This presentation explored Asian-Australian perspectives on Indigenous Reconciliation in Australia, providing both an overview  of the colonialist legacy of White Australia that continues to sustain a problematic relationship between Indigenous- and Asian-Australians, and a discussion on how Indigenous Australians have sought to publicly reclaim their humanity and sense of dignity .  Specifically, the presentation did this through an analytical interpretation of interviews with informed and active Australian citizens who identify themselves as signifying the complex and differentiated admixture of Asian-Australians. 

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Escape from Tibet book cover

The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education and
The Department of Educational Studies (in UBC's
Faculty of Education) present
Documentary Film Screening and Book Discussion
Escape from Tibet

Department of Educational Studies
Ponderosa G Lounge, UBC, 2044 Lower Mall MAP

Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 12:30 to 2:00 pm

RSVP




Critical Dialogues on Education and Society Seminar Series

The Department of Educational Studies and
The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education
(in UBC's Faculty of Education) present
Critical Dialogues on Education and Society Seminar Series
(Critically) Re-imagining the PhD in Education

Two interrelated colloquia on the future of the PhD in Education
in Ponderosa G Lounge, UBC, 2044 Lower Mall MAP

Should We Re-imagine the PhD in Education?
Thursday, September 25, 2014, 12:00 to 1:30 pm

Critically Re-imagining the PhD in Education
Thursday, October 9, 2014, 12:00 to 1:30 pm



 

Dr. Gregory A. Cajete

Faculty of Education: The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education, The Indigenous Education Institute of Canada, NITEP; Faculty of Arts - First Nations Studies Program
Foundations for Sustainable Indigenous Environmental Education and Community Re-Vitalization in Response to Global Climate Change

Tuesday, September 9, 2014, 4:30 to 6:00 pm
First Nations Longhouse, UBC, 1985 West Mall
Dr. Gregory A. Cajete, Director of Native American Studies and Associate Professor at The University of New Mexico College of Education
For further information contact Vanessa Andreotti

Dr. Angus Hikairo Macfarlane

The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education, WERA Global Ethics in HE International Research Network, The Indigenous Education Institute of Canada, and Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education
Diversity, Indigeneity and Education: Lessons from Aotearoa/New Zealand

Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 4:30 to 6:00 pm
Neville Scarfe Room 310, 2125 Main Mall
Dr. Angus Hikairo Macfarlane, Professor of Maori Research at the University of Canterbury
For further information contact Vanessa Andreotti

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WERA Global Ethics International Research Network and The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education
“Getting lost” with/in mixed methods: How mixed methods as nomad science can open doors in higher education research

Monday, May 12, 2014, 12:15 to 2:00 pm
Neville Scarfe Room 310, 2125 Main Mall
Dr. Daniel Newhart, Director for Research, Evaluation, and Planning at Oregon State University in the Division of Student Affairs
For further information contact Vanessa Andreotti

Dr. Carl Mika

WERA Global Ethics International Research Network and The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education
Co-sponsor: Department of Educational Studies (EDST)
‘Presence’ in Colonisation: A Maori View

Friday, March 28, 2014, 12:15 to 2:00 pm
Ponderosa G Lounge, 2044 Lower Mall
Dr. Carl Mika (Tuhourangi/Ngati Whanaunga) is a senior lecturer in Policy, Culture and Social Studies in Education, Faculty of Education, University of Waikato, New Zealand
For further information contact Vanessa Andreotti

Lisa Taylor
Lisa Taylor

Curran Jacobs
Curran Jacobs

WERA Global Ethics International Research Network and The Centre for Culture, Identity & Education
Co-sponsor: Department of Educational Studies (EDST)
Learning to Listen: fostering critically reflexive and ethically committed listening practices amongst non-Indigenous pre-service teachers

Monday, March 3, 2014, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Simon K.Y. Lee Global Lounge & Resource Centre, 2205 Lower Mall
Lisa Taylor is a settler Canadian and Professor in the School of Education at Bishop’s University
Curran Jacobs is a Mohawk educator and Bishop’s University student
For further information contact Vanessa Andreotti

Africa at UBC

The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts and CCIE
Africa at UBC: Performance, Projects and Pedagogy

Friday, October 12, 2012, 1-4 pm
RSVP
St. John's College Social Lounge, 2111 Lower Mall
M A P
Panel with UBC faculty and student organizations working on Africa


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The Inverted Gaze

CCIE, Department of French, Hispanic, & Italian Studies,
Women’s and Gender Studies, Critical Studies in Sexuality

The Inverted Gaze
Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 4 pm
Neville Scarfe 310, 2125 Main Mall, UBC
François Cusset, author of the acclaimed book French Theory, investigates the queering of the French literary canon by American writers and scholars in this thought-provoking and free-minded journey across six centuries of literary classics and sexual polemics. Cusset presents the foundations and rationale for American queer theory, the field of study established in the 1990s and promulgated by writers and scholars such as Judith Butler, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Michael Warner, which challenges a supposed "heteronormative" ideology in our culture. Bold in its themes and propositions, The Inverted Gaze is an extraordinary work about French literature and American queer politics by one of France's most prominent intellectuals.


• • •


Girl walking on railroad tracks Guy walking with backpackYouth in outdoor living room

CCIE and The David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education
Ab/Ob-jection: Encountering the City Through the Landscape of Youth
Tuesday, July 5, 2011, 4 pm RSVP
UBC Liu Institute Gallery, 6476 North West Marine Drive Map
In these ‘New Times’, marked by spectacle, surveillance, and the intense commodification of everyday life, visual culture acts as interlocutor in the changing city. The “Ab/Objection” panel is a companion event to the opening of a critical, counter-conventional documentary photo exhibit of urban working class 'girl' culture. Panelists in this event, including academics and artists, will introduce the audience to existing critical conversations on the place of the visual in the urban landscape – particularly as it is shaped and transformed by youth cultural practices.

  • How do youth consciously symbolize the social spaces in which they find themselves?
  • How do youth challenge those constraints that reproduce class, gender, and racialized forms of oppression in the city?
  • What is the role of art as transformative political praxis?

All ages and levels of familiarity with the subject are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Cedar & Bamboo

CCIE and the Chinese Canadian Historical Society of British Columbia
Cedar & Bamboo – Film Screening and Panel Discussion

October 14, 2010, 12:00 pm
RSVP
UBC First Nations Longhouse 1985 West Mall Map
CO-SPONSORED BY: The Indigenous Education Institute of Canada
Set throughout BC, Cedar & Bamboo explores the intercommunity histories and shared experiences of Chinese Canadians and First Nations. Directed by filmmakers Diana Leung and Kamala Todd, its central focus is on the lives of four people of mixed Indigenous and Chinese ancestry and their formation of strong and meaningful identities in spite of the difficulty of reconciling divergent identities, racist laws, the complexities of familial and ethnic acceptance and/or rejection and personal identification with and alienation from Canada and Canadianness, Chinese First Nations and Indigenous identity.

• • •

Pheng Cheah

CCFI and CFIS COSMO/POLITICS Noted Scholar Lecture Series
Inhuman Conditions: On Cosmopolitanism and Human Rights (March 11, 2010) and
Of Other Worlds to Come
(March 12, 2010)
CO-SPONSORED BY:
Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, Department of Anthropology, Department of Asian Studies, Department of Educational Studies, Department of English, Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies, Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum Studies, and UBC Office of Access and Diversity
Dr. Pheng Cheah
, is Professor in the Department of Rhetoric, University of California at Berkeley. He is the author of Spectral Nationality: Passages of Freedom from Kant to Postcolonial Literatures of Liberation (Columbia, 2003) and Inhuman Conditions: On Cosmopolitanism and Human Rights (Harvard, 2006). He is also the co-editor of Derrida and the Time of the Political (Duke, 2009). He is currently working on books about world literature in the age of global financialization and the concept of instrumentality.

• • •

BC Cancer Research Centre

CCFI Noted Scholar Lecture: Queer<y>ing Health with Pride
Cancer Queer: Towards an Elegiac Politics of Disease
February 10, 2010, noon-1:30 pm
CO-SPONSORED BY:
Centre for Culture, Identity and Education, Critical Studies in Sexuality, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, Department of Anthropology, Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies, Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum Studies, and UBC Office of Access and Diversity
A presentation by Dr. Lochlann Jain, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University
Cancer (as a disease and a culture) is a central trauma of Canadian and American culture. Yet, even with the daily barrage of probabilistic statistics, cancer is often taken to be exceptional. “Why me?” In this talk Dr. Jain examines cancer’s disguises, specifically examining the gender and sexuality of such disguise. While disease identities and politics tend to be dismissed by scientists as “merely cultural,” she will discuss how cancer culture and cancer science are intertwined. Cancer culture’s tropes, such as hope, survivorship, and promises of “the cure,” centrally inform not only how science is done, but which science is done, how it is justified, and which chemicals are pumped into patient bodies. Thus, an explanation of why cancer treatments and survival have barely improved in the last thirty years requires a better understanding of cancer culture.

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Faculty of Education – Indigenous Education Institute of Canada Lecture
Indigenous Knowledge: the Anishinaabe Perspective
October 23, 2009
HOSTED BY:
Faculty of Education – Indigenous Education Institute of Canada, Native Indian Teacher Education Program (NITEP), and Centre for Culture, Identity & Education (CCIE)
A presentation by respected Elder and Spiritual Leader, Bawdwaywidun, Eddie Benton-Banai, Full-blood Ojibwe, Fish Clan is from the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, Wisconsin, USA. The Grand Chief of the Three Fires Society Midewewin Lodge. Bawdwaywidun is a Spiritual Leader, Keeper of the Pipe and Water Drum as well as one of the founding members of the American Indian Movement. He has received a number of awards, including Educator of the Year from the National Indian Education Association (NIEA). Author of two books: The Mishomis Book and Generation to Generation and included in research, articles and books such as Wisdom Keepers: Meetings with Native American Spiritual Elders by H. Arden.

• • •

Global Migration

Faculty of Education Lecture
Global Migration: Changing the face of the world in the 21st century?

October 9, 2009, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
CO-SPONSORED BY:
Liu Institute for Global Issues, Centre for Culture, Identity & Education (CCIE), Office of Graduate Programs & Research, and External Programs & Learning Technologies
Dr. Oliver Bakewell is a Research Officer at International Migration Institute (IMI) at Oxford University. His research interests include the changing patterns ofmigration within Africa; the relationship between migration and development; the interface betwren migration policy and migrants' behaviour, in particular the attitudes towards and use ofpapers (passports, ID cards, visas etc.); forced migration, repatriation and humanitarian aid. He is working on the IMI's African Migrations Programme and the African Perspectives on Humall Mobility Programme Foundation and conducting research in collaboration with colleagues in Nigeria, Morocco, Ghana and DR Congo.

• • •

 
Phantasms and Shapeshifters

CCFI Noted Scholars Lecture Series
Phantasms and Shapeshifters: Imagination and Identity in Computing
September 23, 2009, 1-2:30 pm
CO-SPONSORED BY:
Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE) and the Digital Literacy Center
Dr. Fox Harrell is a researcher, author, and artist exploring the relationship between imaginative cognition and computation. He is Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the department of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He directs the Imagination, Computation, and Expression (ICE) Lab/Studio (icelab.lcc.gatech.edu) in developing new forms of computational narrative and poetry, gaming, social networking, and related digital systems with bases in computer science, cognitive science, and digital media arts.


• • •

 
McLuhan golden arch

CCFI Noted Scholar Lecture Mini-Series
Virtually McLuhan:
Theorizing Code and Digital Life

April 9, 2009, 12-2 pm
Advance readings and lunch provided with RSVP ccfi@interchange.ubc.ca
CO-SPONSORED BY:
Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE), Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education (CCFI), Critical Studies in Sexuality, Department of English, Digital Literacy Centre, Centre for the Study of Historical Consciousness, and the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=home#/event.php?eid=49035424321

Eye for McLuhan

CCFI Noted Scholar Lecture Mini-Series
Virtually McLuhan: Theorizing Code and Digital Life
Advance readings and lunch provided with RSVP
Neville Scarfe Room 310

March 5, noon-2 pm
McLuhan and the Body as Medium
Dr. Richard Cavell
is Professor of English at UBC and author of McLuhan in Space: A Cultural Geography. He is also the creator of the Specters of McLuhan website and joint founding director of the Cultural Spaces series, University of Toronto Press.

March 12, noon-2pm
Two presentations:


The MisEducated Imagination: McLuhan's Creativity
Dr. Arthur Kroker
, Canada Research Chair in Technology, Culture and Theory & Professor, Political Science, University of Victoria.

One Code To Rule Them All...
Dr. Suzanne de Castell
, Professor and Dean, Faculty of
Education, Simon Fraser University.

• • •

Afua Cooper Feb. 25

Black History Month talk: Black Communities in British Columbia, 1858–2008
February 25, 2009, 6:00-9:00 pm
Simon Fraser University, Segal Centre, Room 1400 - 515 Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC

Legacies of Slavery poster

The Legacies of Slavery For Africa and America
October 29, 2008, 6:30 pm, Aquatic Ecological Resource Lab (AERL Theatre)
Room 120, 2202 Main Mall
Presented by Africa Awareness Initiative, Access and Diversity, St. John’s College, Department of History, David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education, The Centre for Culture, Identity and Education (CCIE), UBC Latin American Studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies at SFU, and the Vice President Students.

A lecture by Professor Paul E. Lovejoy
Canada Research Chair in African Diaspora History
Distinguished Research Professor, Department of History, York University, Toronto
Director of the Harriet Tubman Institute for Research on the Global Migrations of African Peoples

Worlding Cities, Pied-à-terre Subjects
September 16, 2008, 12 noon, Green College Coach House
6323 Cecil Green Park Road, UBC
The Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education (CCFI) Noted Scholars Lecture Series co-sponsored by: Departments of Asian Studies, Anthropology, Critical Studies in Sexuality, Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies, Centre for Culture, Identity, and Education (CCIE) and the Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum Studies (CSICS)

The rise of Asian cities as centers of spectacle and speculation challenges conventional notions about the global city as a site of universal human rights. Professor Ong argues that the ambitious Asian city is a branded state-space, a spectralized site that coordinates and generates flows of global knowledge, actors, and values. Pied-à-terre subjects, especially knowledge nomads, are recruited and favored for their production of diverse material and symbolic values. But, while pied‑à‑terre subjects are crucial to the prestige and wealth of the worlding city, they are the embodiment of the denationalized character of capitalism. Poised between staying and going, the knowledge nomad performs a transfer of value that shapes the hyper-metropolis as both a national space and a site of mutating citizenship.

Transforming the Face and Reception of Dis/ability
March 29th , 2008, 7:30-10:30pm, Reception Room, Green College
Organized by Leslie Roman and Geoff McMurchy and sponsored by Green College. CCIE is a contributing sponsor for this event.

The Unruly Salon series shows the power of persons with disabilities to represent their own experiences as a valued part of humanity, humans, being together across borders of many kinds. The Unruly Salon consists of performances by scholars and/or artists with disabilities as knowledgeable, capable, and self-empowered actors, speaking back, staring back, performing out loud, joyfully and in community with all other peoples. This series combines artists and scholars from a range of performance arts, media and interdisciplinary endeavors to create a dialog at UBC not just ‘about us’ but with us. There are seven scheduled Salons this semester. Each Salon will culminate in an informal reception offering presenters, artists and audience an opportunity to discuss ideas raised in presentations. The intent is to facilitate interactive and innovative dialogs and methodologies, leading to further international collaborations for disability arts, culture and scholarly programme development at the graduate and undergraduate levels at UBC.

• • •

International Women's Day: Mothering Work and the Performance of Daily Life Care-giving
March 8th , 2008, 1:00-5:00pm, Reception Room, Green College
Organized by Leslie Roman and Geoff McMurchy and sponsored by Green College. CCIE is a contributing sponsor for this event.

The Unruly Salon series shows the power of persons with disabilities to represent their own experiences as a valued part of humanity, humans, being together across borders of many kinds. The Unruly Salon consists of performances by scholars and/or artists with disabilities as knowledgeable, capable, and self-empowered actors, speaking back, staring back, performing out loud, joyfully and in community with all other peoples. This series combines artists and scholars from a range of performance arts, media and interdisciplinary endeavors to create a dialog at UBC not just ‘about us’ but with us. There are seven scheduled Salons this semester. Each Salon will culminate in an informal reception offering presenters, artists and audience an opportunity to discuss ideas raised in presentations. The intent is to facilitate interactive and innovative dialogs and methodologies, leading to further international collaborations for disability arts, culture and scholarly programme development at the graduate and undergraduate levels at UBC.

• • •

The Misadventures of Critical Thinking - Professor Jacques Rancière
Tuesday, March 7th, 12:15-1:30pm, Scarfe 310
Principally organized by the Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education as part of the CCFI Noted Scholars Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Department of English, Critical Studies in Sexuality, Centre for Culture, Identity, and Education and the Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum Studies. Poster design adapted from original by Donal O Donoghue.

Abstract:  Gramsci once said that the soviet revolution was a revolution against Marx' Capital , because Marx's book had become the book of the Bourgeois scientists. The same thing may have occurred with the forms of social critique, which, forty years ago, denounced the mythologies of the commodity, the fallacies of consumer society, and the empire of the spectacle. They were supposed then to unmask the machineries of domination, so as to provide those who fought against them with new weapons. Apparently they have turned to exactly the contrary: a nihilist wisdom of the reign of the commodity and the spectacle, of the equivalence of anything with anything, of anything with its image and of the lie of any image. I will try to analyze the mechanism of this reversal and to trace it back to the original tension between the logic of social and cultural critique and the logic of emancipation.

Bio: Jacques Rancière is Emeritus Professor of Aesthetics and Politics at the University of Paris VIII where he taught from 1969 to 2000.  He continues to teach, as a visiting professor, in a number of Universities, including Rutgers, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, and Berkeley. His work has been translated into 14  languages, and has been subject to numerous special issues, symposia and critical commentaries. His latest titles to appear in English translation are Disagreement, Politics and Philosophy (1998), Short Voyages to the Land of the People (2003), The Philosopher and his Poor (2004), The Flesh of Words (2004), The Politics of Aesthetics (2005), Film Fables (2006), and The Hatred of Democracy (2007).

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Transnational Place-Making: Food, Justice, and Autonomy - Professor Devon G. Peña, University of Washington
Tuesday, February 5th, 12:15-1:30pm, Scarfe 310
Principally organized by the Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education as part of the CCFI Noted Scholars Lecture Series. Co-sponsored by the Department of English, Critical Studies in Sexuality, Centre for Culture, Identity, and Education and the Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum Studies. Poster design adapted from original by Donal O Donoghue.

Abstract:  While post-modern theories of globalization declare the end of the local (e.g., Appadurai), Professor Peña's talk will present an alternative theory of transnational place-making and re-inhabitation. Place and place-making, he will argue, have decidedly more significance today as localized communities resist all aspects of the neoliberal enclosure of the "commons."  Dr. Peña will discuss his collaborative research with the South Central Farmers Feeding Families, a grassroots organization that established the largest urban farm in the United States and is now involved in a regional campaign for food democracy.

Bio: Devon Peña is Professor of Anthropology and Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington, and an activist in the environmental justice movement. His book, The Terror of the Machine: Technology, Work, Gender, and Ecology on the U.S.-Mexico Border won the "1998 Outstanding Academic Book" award of Choice Magazine and the American Library Association. The book is a study of women workers and their struggles against capitalism and environmental destruction in the maquiladora industry of Juarez, Mexico. His most recent book is Mexican Americans and the Environment (2005, University of Arizona Press). Peña is adjunct professor with Women's Studies, the Center for Water and Watershed Studies, Latin American studies, Program on the Environment, and the
Institute for Public Health Genetics.

• • •

Innocent by Contamination: Queer World-Making, Ethnicity and Technicity in Samuel R. Delany's in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand - A Talk by Dr. Thomas Foster, University of Washington
January 22nd, 2008, 12:15-1:30pm, Scarfe 310, Faculty of Education
Organized by the Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry and sponsored CCIE, Critical Studies in Sexuality and the Centre for the Study of the Internationalization of Curriculum

Thomas Foster is Professor in English at the University of Washington, and the former director of the Cultural Studies Program and an adjunt faculty member in Cognitive Science at Indiana University. He is the author of The Souls of Cyber folk: Posthumanism as Vernacular Theory (University of Minnesota Press). This talk forms part of his current book project, which is focused on the exploration of cyberpunk convention by writers and artists of color and is tentatively entitled Ethnicity and Technicity: Race, Nature, and Culture in the Cyberpunk Archive.

• • •

Glo/cal Citizenship, Music and Inclusive Education
January 19th, 2008, 7:30-10:30pm, Great Hall, Green College
Organized by Leslie Roman and Geoff McMurchy and sponsored by Green College. CCIE is a contributing sponsor for this event.

The Unruly Salon series shows the power of persons with disabilities to represent their own experiences as a valued part of humanity, humans, being together across borders of many kinds. The Unruly Salon consists of performances by scholars and/or artists with disabilities as knowledgeable, capable, and self-empowered actors, speaking back, staring back, performing out loud, joyfully and in community with all other peoples. This series combines artists and scholars from a range of performance arts, media and interdisciplinary endeavors to create a dialog at UBC not just ‘about us’ but with us. There are seven scheduled Salons this semester. Each Salon will culminate in an informal reception offering presenters, artists and audience an opportunity to discuss ideas raised in presentations. The intent is to facilitate interactive and innovative dialogs and methodologies, leading to further international collaborations for disability arts, culture and scholarly programme development at the graduate and undergraduate levels at UBC.

• • •

Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies (ACLALS) Triennial Conference
August 17th - 22nd, 2007, University of British Columbia
Co-sponsored by CCIE and the David Lam for Multicultural Education, among others.

This conference, on the theme "Literature For Our Times", addressed the role and function of literature in the twenty-first century through keynote speeches, paper presentations, panel discussions and literary readings. The program commenced with a reading and commentary by Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott on the evening of August 17, 2007. There were keynote speeches on the mornings of August 18 -22nd, followed by concurrent sessions and panel discussions till the evening of August 22, 2007. Highlights of the conference included a keynote address by CCIE Advisory Board member, Professor Henry Giroux, and a reading by and a question/answer session with acclaimed Kenyan writer, Ngugi wa Thiong'o. Professor Thiong'o also gave a keynote address, in which he explored the importance of translation in fostering new kinds of literary communities among marginalized voices. His keynote was followed by a response paper, given by CCIE Director, Dr. Handel Kashope Wright. Both Professor Ngugi wa Thiong'o's keynote and Professor Handel Wright's response paper are forthcoming.

• • •

Music, Culture and Indigenous Thought in Busoga, Uganda: Cultural Survival and Revival at Mpambo, the African Multiversity - A Talk by Paul Wangoola
Organized by the Museum of Anthropology and co-sponsored by CCIE and David Lam Chair of Multicultural Education.

In this talk, Paul Wangoola discusses the field recordings of Shawn Hall. The two choirs associated with Mpambo and which were recorded by Shawn Hall during a visit in 2004 and samples will also be played. Paulo Wangoola, Nabyama (Founder-President) of the Mpambo Afrikan Multiversity, a recently established and village-based institution of research and higher education dedicated to the revitalization of African Indigenous Thought and Spirituality. The Mpambo campus is located in Isegero, Iganga in Busoga, Eastern Uganda. As part of the work of Mpambo, there is both an Mpambo traditional music and dance group and the Ebanguliro Afrikan Spiritual Choir. A national office is located in Kampala, the capital of Uganda.

• • •

African Delegates: Health and HIV/Aids Grassroots Initiatives Symposium
October  24, 2006, 7pm in Neville Scarfe 310
Organized by the African students in the Faculty of Education and co-sponsored by EPLT, GSSB, GO Global, YLead, The David Lam Chair in Multicultural Education and the Centre for Culture,  Identity and Education (CCIE).

This symposium brought together African delegates working on the front lines of the HIV/AIDS  pandemic.  The purpose of the symposium was to enable delegates to connect with UBC students and faculty around specific projects and initiatives.  The symposium also provided an opportunity for participants to discuss potential partnerships and future funding initiatives, as well as explore how models for social change in their own communities could be applied elsewhere.  The symposium included four panelists, as well as remarks by Her Excellency Ms. Motseoa Senyane, the High Commissioner of Lesotho to Canada.  The four panelists were: Meisie Maaroganye (Community Leader, Evaton West Community Development Forum in South Africa), Lerato Legoabe (Project Coordinator, Girls’ Net), Agnes Pareyio (UN Person of the Year in Kenya, 2005), and Sipho Mamba (formerly from Swaziland’s diplomatic services, AIDS orphans care). The symposium also featured remarks by the Lesotho High Commissioner to Canada, Ms. Motseoa Senyane, who spoke of the pressing need for a clearer and much more unbiased image of Africa. A video-stream of High Commissioner Senyane's comments can be found at the following YouTube feed: Clear words from a Lion

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book launchES

Outsider Within LATEST BOOK BY CCIE ASSOCIATE
Professor Faye V. Harrison- University of Florida

CCIE is please to announce the publication of CCIE Associate, Faye V. Harrison's newest book Outsider Within: Reworking Anthropology in the Global Age." The book "presents an approach to critically reconstructing the anthropology discipline to better encompass issues of gender and race. Among the nine key changes to the field that Faye V. Harrison advocates are researching in an ethically and politically responsible manner, promoting greater diversity in the discipline, rethinking theory, and committing to a genuine multicultural dialogue. In drawing from materials developed during her distinguished twenty-five-year career in Caribbean and African American studies, Harrison analyzes anthropology's limits and possibilities from an African American woman's perspective, while also challenging anthropologists to work together to transcend stark gender, racial, and national hierarchies."

 

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