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Steering Committee

The Steering Committee is composed of individuals, primarily from the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia, and represents not only various departments in the Faculty as well as graduate students and other members of the community, but also various areas of expertise which are related to the Centre's work. In addition, Steering Committee Members assist with the planing and steering of the Centre’s research projects, conferences, speakers, symposia etc., and help to forge connections between stakeholders of the Centre and other, similar organizations and institutions.

UNDER CONSTRUCTION...

Dr. Mary Bryson

Mary Bryson
Associate Professor and Chair
Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education
University of British Columbia

Mary Bryson is Associate Professor in the Department of Educational & Counselling Psychology, and Special Education, and Director of the Centre for Cross-Faculty Inquiry in Education at UBC. Her primary interest is in sociocultural scholarship concerning technology, equity, and pedagogically transgressive use of digital tools. She has numerous publications on theoretical treatments of gender and technology, queer theory, and equity in education, including Radical Interventions (1997) and article in Canadian Journal of Communication, the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education, and Feminist Media Studies, among others. In 2000, Bryson was a recipient of the Canadian Pioneer in New Technologies and Media award. Her SSHRC research, "Queer Women on the Net," is focused on new media, identity, and discursive emplotments of network formation, community and agency www.queerville.ca.

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Dr. Jennifer Chan-Tiberghien

Jennifer Chan
Assistant Professor
Department of Educational Studies
University of British Columbia

Jennifer Chan is Assistant Professor in Adult and Higher Education in the Department of Educational Studies at UBC. Her research focuses on issues of global governance, especially human rights and educational multilateralism; transnational social movements; Japanese civil society; and development of multiculturalism in Japan and France. Her dissertation on the mobilization of global human rights norms by the Japanese women's and children's rights movements received the Gail Kelly Award for Outstanding Dissertation in the field of international comparative education in 2003. Her latest publications include Gender and Human Rights Politics in Japan: Global Norms and Domestic Networks (Stanford University Press, 2004) and Another Japan is Possible: New Social Movements and Global Citizenship Education (Stanford University Press, forthcoming in February 2008).

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Dr. Jo-Anne Dillabough
Photo by Martin Dee

Jo-Anne Dillabough
Associate Professor
Department of Educational Studies
University of British Columbia

Jo-Anne Dillabough is Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Studies and Faculty Associate (2005-2006) at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, and a recipient of Killam Fellowship. From Sept. 2007, she has been appointed to a Readership at the University of Cambridge, UK. Her substantive research work has been to develop a broad but coherent interdisciplinary research agenda which charts the role played by education, in its broadest sense, in the processes of social inclusion/exclusion. She has also been concerned with more general theoretical questions of social, cultural and political identity in the state and its diverse formations across social, geographical and political contexts. Her most recent research projects are concerned with sociological questions pertaining to new youth subcultures, racialization and 21st century forms of moral panic. Her co-edited book (with Madeleine Arnot) is published by RoutledgeFalmer and is entitled 'Challenging Democracy: International Perspectives on Gender, Education and Citizenship' (2000). She is also co-editor (with A. Halsey, H. Lauder, and P. Brown) of Globalisation, Education and Social Change (2006). Recent publications include numerous chapters in edited collections and articles in Curriculum Inquiry, Sociology of Education, British Journal of Sociology of Education, British Journal of Educational Studies, Journal of Gender Studies, British Journal of Sociology, International Studies in Sociology of Education (with S. Acker), Discourse, and Theory and Research in Social Education.

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Dr. Linc Kesler

Linc Kesler
Associate Professor and Director
First Nations Studies Program
University of British Columbia

Linc Kesler is Director of the First Nations Studies Program in the Arts Faculty of UBC Vancouver and an Associate Professor of English.  He previously taught at Oregon State University, where he also coordinated the establishment of an Ethnic Studies Department and other minority education initiatives.  He has research interests in First Nations Studies, US minority literatures, and early modern English literature, and has recently completed Oral Narratives of the Klamath Termination, a collaborative oral history project in digital video, now also developed as an interactive web tool hosted on the FNSP site, for which he also authored the software.

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Dr. Stephen Petrina

Stephen Petrina
Professor
Department of Curriculum Studies
University of British Columbia

Stephen Petrina is Professor, Graduate Coordinator and Deputy Head of the Department of Curriculum Studies. His research is diversified in three directions: The first direction is toward Curriculum Studies and Research Methodology, where he is interested in academic freedom; cognition and learning; the history, politics and sociology of curriculum; and the production and testing of new research methodologies. The second direction is toward Cultural Studies and Science and Technology Studies (STS), where he focuses on the history, historiography, philosophy and sociology of education, medicine, psychology and technology, and how these practices converge. His research into cyberculture, intellectual property rights, new media, religion and technology, and the automation of education is part of this trajectory as well. The third direction is toward Design and Technology Education, New Media education and Educational Technology, where he addresses problems such as equity, class, gender and race as well as curriculum design and theory.

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Dr. Leslie Roman

Leslie Roman
Associate Professor
Department of Educational Studies
University of British Columbia

Leslie G. Roman is Associate Professor of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia. She teaches and publishes in the inter-related areas of feminist theory, anti-colonialism, qualitative methodologies, youth subcultural studies, antiracism, and more recently, critical disability studies. She has published in Educational Theory, The International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Discourse: The Cultural Politics of Education and Anglistica, among numerous others. She is also primary co-editor and a contributor to Dangerous Territories: Struggles for Difference and Equality (Routledge, 1997), Views Beyond the 'Border Country': Raymond Williams and Cultural Politics (Routledge, 1993) and Becoming Feminine: The Politics of Popular Culture, The Falmer Press, 1988), which won the American Educational Studies Outstanding Book of the Book of the Year. She is currently finishing a book tentatively entitled, Contested Knowledge: Feminist Theory, Pedagogies and Politics (Rowman & Litttlefield). She is also the principal investigator for a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Grant, “Burden of Imperfection: Querying British Columbia’s Participation in “the Eugenic Atlantic’” (1878-1996).

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Caroline Rueckert

Caroline Rueckert
Ph.D. Student & CCIE Graduate Research Assistant
Department of Educational Studies
University of British Columbia

Caroline Rueckert is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Educational Studies at UBC. Her research interests are in a hybrid cultural studies, critical multiculturalism, and postcolonial & feminist approaches to diversity and pedagogy. Her thesis work focuses on affect and the ways in which emotions are bound up with stories of justice and injustice. In addition to her scholarly work, Caroline is the co-author of The Study Abroad Handbook (Palgrave 2007) and the editor of Tools for Equity in the Classroom, an online resource manual for student teachers. Her work with the Centre includes everything from design and organizing of symposia to the design, management and updating of the CCIE website, from research on recent developments in multiculturalism and multicultural education to contributions to the organization of the CCIE research space.

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Dr. Steven Talmy

Steven Talmy
Assistant Professor
Department of Language and Literacy Education
University of British Columbia

Steven Talmy is an assistant professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia. His research interests include the negotiation of multilingual identities in institutional interaction, language socialization, critical analyses of discourse, and K-12 ESL. He has published in journals such as Pragmatics, Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, and Language Teaching Research, and has chapters in a number of edited collections.

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Dr. Henry Yu

Henry Yu
Associate Professor
Department of History
University of British Columbia

Henry Yu specializes in the study of trans-Pacific migration and settlement. He is concurrently an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of British Columbia as well as a faculty member of the Asian American Studies Centre at the University of California, Los Angeles. Yu received his B.A. in the Honours History program from the University of British Columbia, and went on to earn his M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University where he pursued studies in History. Yu's publications include the book Thinking Orientals: Migration, Contact, and Exoticism in Modern America, and he is currently working on a new book entitled, "How Tiger Woods Lost His Stripes." For Prof. Yu, who himself is both a second and fourth generation Chinese Canadian, a fuller understanding of Canada's Pacific history, present and future is both a research focus and a personal mission.

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